LOGO

The Cutting Room: Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy talk “THE EDITOR”, Part Two

,,

Welcome to THE CUTTING ROOM, a new weekly column on FANGORIA.com that highlights the stories that most share DNA of our print counterpart. Rather than just feature the articles and interviews that didn’t make the cut, this column is dedicated to providing a greater lifeline between FANGORIA Magazine and FANGORIA.com.

Recently, FANGORIA sat down with ASTRON-6’s Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy to discuss their giallo-inspired horror comedy THE EDITOR, which is destined to hit select theaters and shelves soon from Scream Factory. With Part One of that discussion hitting last week, we now offer the thrilling conclusion to our chat with the Canadian macabre moviemaking collective…

FANGORIA: How was working with Udo Kier? That must have been surreal because he’s even in SUSPIRIA and was a part of the original giallo movies. So he must have appreciated it more than anyone.

KENNEDY: It was amazing.

BROOKS: Udo was the highlight of the entire production. He was a gift. He’s so charming and thoughtful and funny. He came with ideas for everything and they were all good. He got it. He’s an artist. He showed up with no bullshit.

KENNEDY: No ego.

BROOKS: Right, no ego. He showed up and told us he didn’t need a dressing room. He could see we needed everything we could get and he gave that up for us. We kept him up until five in the morning in an unair-conditioned building in August. It was in the middle of a heatwave and we were trying to pack 23 people into a small room to shoot. We were sweating and shooting for hours and then told him that he could go home at five in the morning and we could shoot his reverses over someone else’s shoulders. He was like, “No, no, no. You’ll shoot over my shoulder. I’m Dr. Casini. No one else.” The guy is awesome.

KENNEDY: As soon as he showed up and started reading the script, we knew it was perfect.

BROOKS: The biggest mistake we made was not giving him a way bigger part. He should have played the editor. He’s awesome and if we make another movie or ten movies I want him to be in all of them.

FANGORIA: What was it like to work with Paz de la Huerta?

KENNEDY: She’s a genuine eccentric. I think she did a great job.

BROOKS: I think she’s fantastic in the film and ENTER THE VOID and on BOARDWALK EMPIRE.

KENNEDY: She came to it with her own vision, I guess, and at times that clashed with us, but in the end, it turned out well.

FANGORIA: Is it tough for the five of you in Astron-6 to decide on what project to do next?

BROOKS: Well, we don’t really decide on things between the five of us. This one was just Matt and I who decided to make this. We want everyone to come with us. But Steve [Kostanski] and Jeremy [Gillespie] live in Toronto. We used to all live together and it was great. But that’s years ago now. So Steve and Jeremy could only contribute what they could send to us.

Conor lived near us for half of the shoot and lived in Vancouver for the other half. But he co-wrote the script. You know, any of the five of us just take on a project and hopefully invites the other four along. That’s how it goes.

EDITOR2

FANGORIA: So how did the production on THE EDITOR change after you got the Telefilm money?

BROOKS: We actually got it at the start and thank god we did. The sizzle real we did ourselves on SLR. We were going to just shoot it all that way, but thankfully we got the money from Telefilm and were able to start over on a bigger level. We needed to take a step up after FATHER’S DAY. We didn’t want to take a sideways step and make the same movie.

KENNEDY: Although you could argue it’s the same movie. [laughs]

BROOKS: There are things that I will happily admit are the same. The car chase is in the same location and is kind of the same thing. But that’s also because I kind of wanted to take back ownership of FATHER’S DAY.

FANGORIA: I enjoyed how you poked fun at the misogyny of those original giallo movies. Was that something you guys wanted to have in from the beginning?

BROOKS: It was. Right from the start. You’ve got to acknowledge that. It would be criminal to overlook it and pretend it didn’t happen. The movie that did it for me is STRIP NUDE FOR YOUR KILLER. There’s just so much in there.

FANGORIA: NEW YORK RIPPER isn’t an easy ride either.

BROOKS: [laughs] Sure, sure.

KENNEDY: But STRIP NUDE FOR YOUR KILLER is even higher. It’s casual even. The movie ends on a rape joke. That had to be played with. It’s just so weird.

FANGORIA: Any thoughts on what you’ll do next?

BROOKS: We’ve got a lot of ideas, we’ve got a couple scripts, we’ve got a few treatments, and we have no money.

KENNEDY: Literally negative money. So, we’re ready to go on the next project, but we’re just not sure what it will be or how we’ll make it.

BROOKS: We need a producer or an investor or somebody. We need some help.

FANGORIA: Are you going to try and screen THE EDITOR in Italy?

BROOKS: Of course. I’m curious how they’re going to react to it. Claudio Simonetti seemed to like it when he wrote the theme. I know from speaking to Claudio and reading interviews with Fabio Frizzi, those guys are apparently the least popular in Italy. They tour the world, but in Italy, no one cares. So I’m not even sure how popular the giallos are in Italy.

KENNEDY: They were made primarily for North American audiences, so maybe they don’t really consider them Italian films.

BROOKS: I hope they aren’t offended or anything. We genuinely love them.

THE EDITOR hits DVD/Blu-ray from Scream Factory on Tuesday, September 8th. Look out for more on THE EDITOR here at FANGORIA.com!

Related Articles
About the author
Phil Brown

Phil Brown is a journalist, writer, and wiseacre who rattles his
keyboard from somewhere in Toronto. He writes about film and comedy
for a variety of websites/publications like Fangoria (duh!), Now
Magazine, The Toronto Star, Comics And Gaming Magazine, Toro, Critics
Studio, and others. He’s also been known to whip up the occasional
comedy sketch or short film. If you feel like being friends, go ahead
and find him. He doesn’t bite (much).

Back to Top