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New Jess Franco Blu-rays/DVDs coming from Redemption/Kino

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Spanish maverick Jess Franco, who died earlier this year, will be commemorated with deluxe Blu-ray and DVD releases of three of his most important horror films this summer. Read on for the cover art and details.

In association with Eurociné, Kino Lorber and Redemption Films will release THE AWFUL DR. ORLOF (1962), A VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD (1973) and NIGHTMARES COME AT NIGHT (1970) on August 20. All three have been newly mastered in high definition from archival film elements provided by Eurociné, and will be presented in French with optional English subtitles as well as English-dubbed versions, produced by Bret Wood. The specs are as follows:

THE AWFUL DR. ORLOF:

• Original, uncensored French-language version

• New audio commentary by Video Watchdog’s Tim Lucas

• “The Horror of Orlof,” one of the last videotaped interviews with Franco, directed by David Gregory and produced by Elijah Drenner

• Newly filmed remembrances by Franco’s friends and collaborators, directed by Daniel Gouyette

A VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD:

• Original uncut version (a.k.a. CHRISTINA, PRINCESS OF EROTICISM), plus the recut edition with zombie footage directed by Jean Rollin

• New audio commentary by Lucas

• “Mysterious Dreams,” another of Franco’s last interviews, by Gregory and Drenner

• Deleted orgy scene featuring Alice Arno

• More posthumous tributes by Franco’s friends and collaborators, directed by Gouyette

NIGHTMARES COME AT NIGHT:

• New audio commentary by Lucas

• Another memorial video by Gouyette

• Mini-documentary to be announced

Retail prices will be $24.95 for the DVDs, $29.95 for the Blu-rays. “Franco was, and is, a true hero of exploitation cinema, says Redemption founder Nigel Wingrove. “A man who loved, ate and slept film, and who in his heart was an artist, and like most artists he had his flaws and weaknesses, but ultimately what made him an artist was that he could do nothing else but make films. He may have used a camera rather than a paintbrush and film instead of a canvas, but that was because film was his blood, and he only stopped filming when his blood stopped flowing and his heart, like his camera, finally stopped.”

Keep an eye out for our special Franco tribute issue of Fango, on sale in June.

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About the author
Michael Gingold
Michael Gingold has been a member of the FANGORIA team for the past three decades. After starting as a writer for the magazine in 1988, he came aboard as associate editor in 1990 and two years later moved up to managing editor, the position he holds to this day while continuing to contribute numerous articles and reviews.
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