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    Jim Carrey, Keanu Reeves, More join Amirpour’s “BAD BATCH”

    For lovers of international and art house horror, there was nary a 2015 title that was as breathtaking and bold as A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, the Spectrevision title from up-and-coming auteur Ana Lily Amirpour. Of course, with such a unique artistic statement that was as stylish as it was captivating, Amirpour got noticed quick and by art film megaproducer Megan Ellison of all people. Now, with her second film, a dystopian love story featuring southbound cannibals called THE BAD BATCH, taking shape, Amirpour has secured one hell of a cast for her sophomore cinematic effort.

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    FANGO Flashback: “RAVENOUS”

    When horror fans think “cannibal film,” there’s a few images that come immediately to mind: insect-ridden skeletal remains, thick jungle brush, blood-soaked savages, etc. Perhaps if not the jungle cannibal films, horror fans might think of the domestic cannibal flicks, whether it be more southern fried fare like the work of H.G. Lewis or the ominous creepshow of the Hannibal Lecter films. But among the more accepted endeavors in the cannibal subgenre, a few exceptional fright flicks approach the genre with utter unique and mind-bending tales that far too often fall between the cracks; Antonia Bird’s RAVENOUS is among those films.

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    SXSW ’15: “AMERICAN HORROR STORY’s” John Carroll Lynch talks Karyn Kusama’s “THE INVITATION”

    One of the most-praised genre films to play at this year’s SXSW Film Festival has been the intense, character-oriented chiller THE INVITATION. Among the ensemble is actor John Carroll Lynch (“Twisty” on AMERICAN HORROR STORY: FREAK SHOW), who discusses his role in this exclusive FANGORIA chat.

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    “REBOUND” (Film Review)

    When it comes to independent filmmaking, the dynamic between the familiar and the fresh is always an important one to observe. In this sense, a film can be aware of the subversion it has made to specific expectations or genre tropes, but only after it has become cognizant that the audience should be familiar with the story or subject matter. It’s an odd narrative tug-o-war, yet one seemingly necessary for a majority of genre films, especially ones such as Megan Freels Johnston’s REBOUND.

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    Full Moon Streaming Partners with Joe Dante’s “TRAILERS FROM HELL”

    THE HOWLING and GREMLINS legend Joe Dante’s celebrated web series TRAILERS FROM HELL, in which some of strange cinema’s brightest stars (like Guillermo del Toro, Mick Garris, Eli Roth, Roger Corman and many, many more) share their insights into a selection of cult, horror and fantasy films, cut against and over a cavalcade of classic movie trailers, is coming to Charles Band’s B-movie channel Full Moon Streaming. It’s like film school crushed into bloody, brilliant byte sized master classes.

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    “GHOUL” (2015; Movie Review)

    GHOUL set a genre box-office record in its opening weekend in its native Czech Republic, no doubt in part due to its appropriation of the true story of Soviet cannibal Andrei Chikatilo. One wonders how those audiences felt once they realized that Chikatilo’s presence largely amounts to name-dropping in the midst of a very familiar found-footage scenario.

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    NYC! FANGORIA and More to Sign “COVER TO COVER” at Forbidden Planet!

    Hey, Big Apple! After a scar-studded event at Burbank’s Creature Features shop last weekend, FANGORIA is teaming up with New York City’s Forbidden Planet (the fantastic horror sci-fi collectibles store at 832 Broadway near Union Square; [212] 473-1576) to host a signing of our new FANGORIA: COVER TO COVER coffee table book from Cemetery Dance Publishing! The signing will take place on Thursday, April 2nd from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and feature FANGORIA’s top creative and editorial crew, plus a slew of genre notables to be announced shortly!

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    FANTASTICA Presents: Appreciating Horror Beyond Horror

    Upon consideration, one rarely gets their first taste of horror from the horror genre itself. For an unfortunate number, it comes from reality: whether personal or not, tragedy and inhumanity can lead one’s young mind into dark places. For others, it can be from our own imagination, with dark corners of rooms and unfamiliar noises guiding us towards the paranoid and petrifying. But for the rest of us, it comes in the cinema from which we least expect it, often in the genres we trust not to drag us into terror.

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