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    “BEHIND THE SCENES OF TOTAL HELL” (Movie Review)

    There’s a great scene in Tim Burton’s ED WOOD in which Wood is talking to a Hollywood producer after dropping off a copy of his first movie, GLEN OR GLENDA?. When the producer tells him that it’s “the worst film I ever saw,” Wood assures him that his next one will be even better. That is the enthusiasm of the independent filmmaker. They are driven to tell stories on celluloid, often without the benefit of a budget, a talented cast, or a clue. The results may turn out brilliantly, but in many cases the results are varying shades of crap.

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    New poster to “CARRIE” you through the weekend

    Sure, there’s a new motion poster for Kimberly Peirce’s CARRIE redo, but more than anything, I just want to know why this Keep Calm… trend endures.

    As you probably know, the original Keep Calm and Carry On posters were one of a series of designs from the British Government’s Ministry of Information and produced by His Majesy’s Stationery Office to boost morale midst World War II. The Keep Calm design was never actually displayed for the public, but ended up rediscovered in 2000. Since, it’s become a pop culture display, utilized by almost every niche of fandom and the like, and while it hasn’t gone away, is certainly very, very tired.

    But! Carry and CARRIE are homophones, and so it’s been used in anticipation of the Chloe Moretz-starring adaptation of Stephen King’s classic novel. Flashing are scenes specifically from her telekinetic prom mayhem, which if keep getting shown in trailers likely won’t have much of an effect on screen and calmness is exactly how everyone will keep.

    You can see the poster at the CARRIE tumblr.

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    New York haunter Tim Haskell looks forward to this summer’s all-night “CAMP NIGHTMARE”

    It’s the beginning of Memorial Day weekend and summer, however unofficially, is here. A season with special ties to horror, it is where the youthful inclination of exploration and reckless abandon meets undeserved punishment, and when you close your eyes it’s envisioned as converging in one place: Camp. Endlessly revisited through FRIDAY THE 13TH sequels, THE BURNING and what have you, camp is a kind of mythical space whose forest getaway is recognizable to audiences and conceivably not very far from their own cabin experiences, minus the kills. Well, until now.

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    “EVIL DEAD (2013)” (Original Soundtrack Review)

    Now that the flurry of passionate yeas and nays flung over director Fede Alvarez’s EVIL DEAD remake has subsided, it’s a good time to take a deeper look at one of the more heralded changes Alvarez made with his DEAD interpretation: the score by composer Roque Baños (THE MACHINIST, SEXY BEAST), just released on compact disc from La-La Land records.

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    Filmmaker Patrick Rea talks Horror, the Midwest and his new film “NAILBITER”

    In Kansas, there are few things scarier than a tornado or a basement.

    Midwestern filmmaker Patrick Rea’s new horror film has plenty of both, and a little something extra too. It’s that last bit that a mother and her daughters find themselves facing during a killer storm in NAILBITER.  Rea’s new feature is just the most recent work; he’s been making horror shorts for more than 10 years, and he’s just getting started.

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    Q&A: Borderlands’ Thomas Monteleone talks re-introducing the work of Henry Kuttner

    The crew over at Borderlands Press calls Henry Kuttner a “secret superstar.” It is an appellation that seems more than apt when one considers the profound impact this largely overlooked fantastic fiction maestro had on some of the most revered figures in the genre—Richard Matheson and Ray Bradury each dedicated books to Kuttner (I AM LEGEND and DARK CARNIVAL, respectively); William Burroughs saw fit to quote him in his work; Lovecraft considered him a friend and worthy purveyor of Cthulhu Mythos; Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Roger Zelazny, and other dark fiction luminaries cite him as an influence. Alas, in the years since his far-too-early death at age 42 in 1958—and despite the efforts of a coterie of staunch devotees—Kuttner’s work has fallen further and further off the dark literature radar. 

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