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    Report: Stranger With My Face Horror Film Fest 2013

    Down under Down Under sits the island of Tasmania; if you go any further south, you’re only likely to encounter Japanese whaling ships before hitting the ice floes of Antarctica. It’s the end of the Earth—or, as director Jennifer Lynch, special international guest of this year’s Stranger With My Face Horror Film Festival, optimistically suggests, “It could be the beginning.”

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    Q&A: “HEMLOCK GROVE” Actress Kandyse McClure

    In HEMLOCK GROVE, the small town of the title finds itself enmeshed in a wave of murders, monsters, secret experiments and more. Looking into all the strangeness—or perhaps helping perpetuate it—is Dr. Clementine Chasseur, played by Kandyse McClure, who spoke to FANGORIA about her role and other genre credits—including a pair of Stephen King remakes.

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    “MR. JONES” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Seemingly the most divisive midnight/horror offering at the Tribeca Film Festival this year, MR. JONES has garnered reaction across the spectrum. What’s odd though is how in polite conversation, most have refrained from mentioning just how admirably weird Karl Mueller’s sort-of found footage feature debut gets in its second half. MR. JONES is a strange beast and for better or worse—or however you come out of it—refreshing in that it’s a fairly unique, Lynchian addition to the current glut of docu-style terror.

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    Q+A: Stephen Volk on Cushing tribute novella “WHITSTABLE”

    Perhaps best known for his screenwriting work (GOTHIC, GHOSTWATCH, THE AWAKENING) Stephen Volk has also become increasingly prominent as a writer of short genre fiction. His new novella WHITSTABLE tells a fictionalised tale of horror legend Peter Cushing encountering a real-life monster; not in a Transylvanian castle, but in a humdrum English seaside town. An empathic, deeply melancholic work, WHITSTABLE sensitively handles not only its account of everyday, domestic horrors, but also the character of Cushing himself: a decent, dignified man racked with grief over the death of his beloved wife Helen. Perhaps the highest compliment I can pay the book is that it manages to capture the essence of what has made Peter Cushing so beloved amongst successive generations of genre fans, and in the centenary of his birth, he could receive no finer tribute.

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    Fairuza Balk gets a “DOSE OF REALITY”

    The line between thriller and horror is finite and often subjective and here at FANGORIA laboratories. We are often in horn-locked debate over what we should cover and what we should leave on the shelf. In the case of the indie flick DOSE OF REALITY, the plot synopsis might normally make us shy away. In it, two greaseballs running a fleapit bar are getting ready to close up for the night, when a wild eyed woman emerges from the ladies room saturated in blood and claiming to have been attacked. As the men try to alternately come to her aid and figure out if she’s telling the truth, the damaged damsel begins slowly, surely turning tables around, even overturning them as a bizarre dialogue driven, psychological cat and mouse drama plays out.

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