LOGO
  • ,,

    Kim Ki-duk’s “MOEBIUS” (TIFF Movie Review)

    Kim Ki-duk might be the most outrageous and provocative filmmaker working in South Korea, something not easily accomplished given the competition. Yet, despite all of the shock tactics that Ki-duk has pulled in the past, nothing comes close to the nightmarish glee with which he unleashes MOEBIUS. It’s a movie that walks the line between “like” and “respect.” You can’t really do the former without a certain level of self-deception, but the latter comes easily enough. It takes an equal balance of guts and insanity simply to launch a movie like this, so kudos to Ki-duk for doing so. As for the audiences who will be sucking it up through their eyeholes…well, you’ll never forget what you see here.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “THE DOUBLE” (TIFF Movie Review)

    Despite serving up plum roles for a pair of contemporary stars and coming from one of the most promising filmmakers of the moment, there’s something delightfully old fashioned about Richard Ayoade’s THE DOUBLE. It’s one of those identity crisis existential horror movies that were all the rage in the heady art cinema days of the 60s. The film comes from a novella by Dostoevsky, features style and technique pulled from Roman Polanski and Orson Welles’ THE TRIAL. Yet it somehow also feels very much like a film of the moment. It’s a nightmare movie that crawls under your skin, while also proving to be one of the funniest features of the Toronto International Film Festival. Thematically, the flick is not an easy sit and yet Ayoade somehow makes it play as pure pleasure through his sardonic humor and cynical worldview. I guess you could call it a movie comprised of contradictions, and a wonderful one at that.

    Read more »
  • ,

    New Voodoo-centric art for “AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN”

    Here’s a lot more of that live Voodoo doll.

    Set in New Orleans, a large component of AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN will be Voodoo. Angela Bassett is playing real-life practitioner Marie Laveau and the story is said to revolve around a longstanding rivalry between those who practice the Louisiana magic and a coven who descend from Salem witches. That’s been actualized in some of COVEN’s promotional art depicting what most readily calls to mind the infamous “Voodoo Doll.”

    AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN premieres October 9. Its first episode, “Bitchcraft,” will see a young girl, Zoe, shattered to discover she possesses a strange genetic affliction tracing back to the dark days of Salem. Zoe is whisked away to Miss Robichaux’s Academy for Exceptional Young Ladies, a mysterious school in New Orleans devoted to safeguarding the few remaining descendants who share this unique bloodline. Harboring a secret agenda, Fiona Goode, the most powerful witch of their generation, returns to town, reigniting old rivalries with the Coven’s deadly enemies, the Voodoo.

    Read more »
  • ,

    “DRY BONES” and “LEGEND OF SIX FINGERS” to Double Feature World Premiere in Buffalo

    DRY BONES, the latest from SLIME CITY director Gregory Lamberson is ready to be unveiled. Coincidentally, so is the new feature from his DRY BONES cinematographer, Sam Qualiana (SNOW SHARK: ANCIENT SNOW BEAST), THE LEGEND OF SIX FINGERS. Thus, a double header of a world premiere is planned for Thursday, September 26 at the Market Arcade Film and Arts Centre in Buffalo, NY, before the two films head gear up for theatrical and festival screenings in the ensuing weeks.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “GRAVITY” (TIFF Movie Review)

    Based on the broadest definition of genre, Alfonso Cuarón’s astounding new film GRAVITY doesn’t cleanly qualify as horror. It is however guaranteed to be one of the most terrifying viewing experiences of the year, so it seems silly not to acknowledge it. After disappearing from filmmaking for seven years following the technically ambitious and thematically complex CHILDREN OF MEN, Cuarón has returned with a movie quite simply unlike anything else. As a depiction of space travel, the realism and immersion of GRAVITY is unparalleled; the story then uses that realism to make the space environment feel more unforgiving and chilling than ever before.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2” (Movie Review)

    The challenge involved in making a direct horror sequel like INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 is that it’s harder to mystify and scare both audiences and the characters the second time around. Fortunately, returning director James Wan and screenwriter Leigh Whannell have partially changed the source of the terror for CHAPTER 2, though it takes the film a little while to get there.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Q&A: Lin Shaye on “INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2”

    Horror has always been a safe haven for character actors, offering a showcase for their range and presence while providing them the type of roles they might not be able to inhabit in other types of movies. And while some actors view the genre with discontent, others welcome fear fare with open arms, embracing their roles with a dedication even beyond what the material entails. One of these is Lin Shaye, a genre veteran with such films under her belt as A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, CRITTERS and THE HIDDEN, who received a new level of visibility with her prominent role in INSIDIOUS and returns tomorrow in INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2.

    Read more »
Back to Top