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    “WILD AT HEART” (Blu-ray Review)

    As a filmmaker who provokes curiosity and emotion through visually stunning narratives, David Lynch’s films are always thrilling to rediscover via high definition. With its last domestic release currently out of print on DVD, specialty distributor Twilight Time stepped up to the plate for the Blu-ray of one of Lynch’s most entertaining and colorful films, WILD AT HEART. With only 2 other Lynch films formally released on that format in the U.S. (BLUE VELVET and DUNE) and select Lynch works unavailable on any medium, this limited edition print is surely on every collector’s shopping list.

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    “Pro Wrestlers vs. Zombies” (Film Review)

    In the world of genre film, there’s a seemingly constant discussion about the validity of “fun” as a means to excuse poor filmmaking. Speaking in a narrative sense, there is admittedly leeway in terms of logic and execution with horror films even if the story comes first and foremost. When a film hinges so much on this perspective however, a certain amount of desperation permeates and criminally depreciates the fun factor.

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    “THE CANAL” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    THE CANAL begins. David addresses the camera directly (us). Within the film however, he’s speaking to an audience of children. As a cinema archivist, David is attempting to convey the importance of what these schoolchildren are about to witness. Introducing footage from the early 1900s, he tells them they’ll see ghosts, that everyone onscreen is now dead. To the viewer, it’s foreshadowing yes, but something more. Writer-director Ivan Kavanagh is engaging the dread in inevitability, as well as—through David’s profession and a host of unmistakable horror references to come—why we tell domestic horror stories: they keep occurring.

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    “13 SINS” (Movie Review)

    Never mind the fact that it’s a remake; 13 SINS, through a coincidence of release timing, is also in the unfortunate position of begging comparison to E.L. Katz’s masterful recent CHEAP THRILLS, both being films exploring the deep, dangerous lengths their characters will go for promised fortunes.

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    “HOLLISTON: THE COMPLETE SECOND SEASON” (Blu-ray Review)

    Few genres are as subjective as comedy. Since tastes are defined by culture, shared experiences and one’s threshold for silliness, comedy is rarely considered to be as inclusive in terms of subject matter or execution. To this point, one could look at horror as the flip side of the coin, an inclusive genre that often leans more on technical skill to achieve universally effective frights. Therefore, when horror and comedy mix, the filmmakers must carefully gel these aesthetics in order to appease both the objective lovers of horror and the subjective fans of comedy.

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    “WAR OF THE WORLDS: GOLIATH” (Blu-ray Review)

    The decision to review a 3D animated sci-fi epic on this, one of the most celebrated horror movie websites may seem odd, but not to this writer. The film in question, WAR OF THE WORLDS: GOLIATH is a dark, ambitiously designed film whose soul not only belongs to its source—HG Wells literary masterwork—but to Jeff Wayne’s cult phenomenon double LP concept album, 1978’s “Jeff Wayne’s Musical Version of War of the Worlds.” That platter was a favorite of this writer during his childhood and remains so. Like that album and its accompanying, graphically illustrated book, WOTW: GOLIATH (which was released overseas some time ago) is evocative, violent and epic in scope, and firmly dependent on sound to deliver its grim thrills.

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    “ALIEN ABDUCTION” (Movie Review)

    This deep into the resurgence of found-footage horror, most contemporary fright fans have already made up their minds regarding the subgenre. To some, the approach is a fresh way to apply a first-person perspective to otherwise tired genres while presenting a challenge to resourceful filmmakers. To others, it’s a cheap, frustrating method for directors to present jump-scares at the cost of well-constructed storytelling and convincing performances. However, as with most hotly debated subjects, the reality lies somewhere in the grey area between the two.

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    “JINN” (Movie Review)

    According to the ads, JINN is “The secret half the world has been keeping”—and they’re not the only ones. The movie opened today with no advance screenings, and in such situations one can hope for an unheralded surprise, or at least maybe a new trash classic. Unfortunately, one hilarious highlight aside, neither is the case here.

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