LOGO
  • ,,,

    “DA SWEET BLOOD OF JESUS” (Movie Review)

    Spike Lee has been somewhat cryptic—though not exactly reticent—in expressing his unhappiness over the studio meddling he strongly suggests marred his vision for his reworking of Park Chan-wook’s landmark OLDBOY a couple years back. Not for nothing, it seems, was the ultra-brutal revenge thriller dubbed a “Spike Lee Film” rather than a “Spike Lee Joint.”

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “POKER NIGHT” (Blu-ray Review)

    Having last seen POKER NIGHT on the big screen, I’ve been surprised about how few horror fans have had the film on their radar. From the initially FANGORIA-presented screening, the film absolutely blew away this writer’s expectations, delivering something creepy, funny, brutal and compelling all in one sitting. But unlike several less-than-great titles that hit around the same time, there was a certain unjust preconception around the horror lot that the film wasn’t up to snuff thanks to its masked antagonist. So with POKER NIGHT’s impending Blu-ray release, this writer took the opportunity to revisit the film and see if it’s particular brand of horror held up on a second viewing in high definition.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “LOVE AT FIRST BITE” / “ONCE BITTEN” Double Feature (Blu-ray Review)

    In Scream Factory’s attempts to bring unheralded gems of genre cinema to Blu-ray, the company has also culled some of the most beloved, but more obscure, cult classics into the fold as well. Whether it be sleazy, insane or outright absurd, Scream Factory is giving these titles new life among their creepy catalog. And while sometimes this leads to some truly exceptional rediscoveries, it also occasionally leads to cult misfires as well, such as the Double Feature Blu-ray of Howard Storm’s ONCE BITTEN and Stan Dragoti’s LOVE AT FIRST BITE.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “VAMPIRE’S KISS” / “HIGH SPIRITS” Double Feature (Blu-ray Review)

    While Scream Factory has often brought many underappreciated genre classics to the world of high definition, they’ve also done a great service to cult film fans by bringing some of horror’s most odd titles to Blu-ray as well. Yet as of late, Scream Factory has found greater success in bringing these demented discoveries to audiences as double features, which of course comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. And, particularly, Scream Factory has used this business model to help bring vintage horror comedies to fans, offering a safety net to an unpredictable subgenre that offers the likes of Robert Bierman’s VAMPIRE’S KISS and Neil Jordan’s HIGH SPIRITS.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “RPG: REAL PLAYING GAME” (Film Review)

    By now, the general conceit of RPG: REAL PLAYING GAME is oh-so-familiar to genre fans: a group of strangers are forced to kill each other in an interactive game run by a sinister entity. Whether it be BATTLE ROYALE, THE HUNGER GAMES, THE RUNNING MAN, GAMER or the multitude of other films running with that concept, RPG does have select differences in its execution that makes it stand out more to the horror crowd. But even despite some ingenious flourishes, interesting character drama and the constraints of its budget, the conceptual familiarity is the least of RPG’s problems.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “THE MONTAUK CHRONICLES” (Film Review)

    Writer/director Christopher P. Garetano’s arch pseudo-documentary THE MONTAUK CHRONICLES has existed in various forms and cuts for almost five years. Screened publicly in 2012, Garetano kept obsessively tinkering with the film, adding footage, re-structuring and delaying its official release time and time again. Of course, for those that were following its stop-and-start existence, the behind the scenes drama only added to the myth of the film and drew attention the shadowy conspiracies it aims to investigate. Now, New Yorkers will have the chance to catch the world premiere of the current – and purportedly final – cut, screening as part of the Third Annual Phillip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival, this Saturday at 5 p.m. at The Producer’s Club.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    “HELL FIRE” (DVD Review)

    HELL FIRE, just out on DVD and VOD from Midnight Releasing, is the latest from New York’s Insane-O-Rama Productions, and lives up to the promise of that herald. Out of its mind and bloody as heck, it’s a jolt of adrenaline into the veins of the grassroots horror scene.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “STONEHEARST ASYLUM” (Blu-ray Review)

    As someone who has been with the horror genre so consistently over the course of his career, it’s a surprise that Brad Anderson is still one of the more underappreciated genre filmmakers working today. This is especially so considering his versatility among his projects, handing in a kinetic, mainstream thriller like THE CALL while also offering brooding suspense in SESSION 9 and off-kilter tension in STONEHEARST ASYLUM. And with STONEHEARST, Anderson takes on a bigger challenge than he’s yet to do: adapt the period-appropriate work of Edgar Allen Poe while maintaining a unique cinematic voice of his own.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL” (Blu-ray Review)

    PLANET OF THE APES director Franklin J. Schaffner’s chilling 1978 programmer THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL is one of those glorious international, big budget melting pot thrillers whose presence has long since ebbed, having peaked in the 1970’s before fading into oblivion. But the film, based on a wild same-named novel by ROSEMARY’S BABY author Ira Levin, is miles removed from DOCTOR ZHIVAGO, WHERE EAGLES DARE; BOYS is a horror movie, plain and simple. The film follows Levin’s interest in perverted child birth while it exemplifies Schaffner’s deft hand at wrangling massive casts (who again, speak a wide array of languages), multiple locations and managing to make sprawling pictures that are both supremely epic while claustrophobically intimate. And though it wasn’t a financial success upon release, the film has found a devoted cult via TV airings and later, the VHS rental market. And now, Shout! Factory has brought it to Blu-ray.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “POKER NIGHT” (Film Review)

    There’s a certain beauty in independent films that the VOD/STV market has instilled in the viewing experience that otherwise is only found around film festivals, and that’s the absence of expectation. Looking at the promotional material for POKER NIGHT, the film could be confused for a masked slasher film or a late stage addition into the torture porn subgenre. And yet with little in the way of hype or criticism before the screening, I couldn’t really nail down what the film would be and, more importantly, where it would go.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Exodus: “BLOOD IN, BLOOD OUT” (Album Review)

    The first thing that comes to mind when listening to the opening track of Exodus’s new album, BLOOD IN, BLOOD OUT, is, that unlike several of the band’s peers, age has in no way mellowed the band in the slightest. “Black 13” is a crushing example of thrash metal done to perfection, as if the band were frozen in a block of ice in 1987 and then released to terrorize the populace (like Christopher Lee’s Dracula in the beginning of Hammer’s 1968 epic DRACULA HAS RISEN FROM THE GRAVE).

    Read more »
Back to Top