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  • “THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DOOR” (Film Review)

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    In the film’s favor, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DOOR isn’t the trainwreck most people expect to see from the studio system nowadays, nor is it anything exceptional as well. Simply put, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DOOR is a fairly unremarkable exercise in horror cinema, managing to be both generic and effective simultaneously. And while the film wears its influences on its sleeve- in fact, similarities to PET SEMATARY are uncanny at times-, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DOOR rehashes and repurposes notable genre tactics because they’re known to work, and in that case, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE DOOR is creepy, if not truly original in nature.

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  • “THE CORPSE OF ANNA FRITZ” (Film Review)

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    If you’re going to be tackling a movie about necrophilia, there’s a good chance that it’s likely going to be a polarizing experience. However, as fate would have it, necrophilia is simply the beginning of the wicked path shown in THE CORPSE OF ANNA FRITZ, an exercise in tension that will grip the audience from start to finish. Yet if there’s anything that’s truly shocking about THE CORPSE OF ANNA FRITZ, it’s how well director Hector Hernandez Vicens makes conventional story beats seem so unconventional via the use of misdirection that would put a magician to shame.

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  • “THE FINAL PROJECT” (Movie Review)

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    THE FINAL PROJECT begins by addressing a question oft-unanswered in found-footage movies: Who found and is presenting the footage, and why? The first scene has a shadow-shrouded figure telling us he has put together the following visual document as “some type of effort to try and better understand what happened that night.”

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  • “THE BOY” (2015) (Blu-ray Review)

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    It’s always going to be frustrating to discuss the legacy of Craig Macneill’s THE BOY, not to be confused with the William Brent Bell film that hit theaters mere months after its release. And even more frustrating than sharing a title with a major studio horror film is the fact that the Spectrevision production is a legitimately fantastic bit of slow-burn, dread-inducing horror, earning both Chainsaw Award nominations and a spot on several Top 10 lists last year. So luckily, THE BOY will get a chance to get in front of more fright fans with its brand new Blu-ray release, courtesy of Scream Factory.

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  • “CONVERGENCE” (Blu-ray/DVD Review)

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    “The quality of our lives here, how we relate to this world and most especially the concern we express for our fellow humans, vastly affects the quality of the part of our being that persists after the death of our bodies,” MIT-trained physicist Gerald Schroeder writes in his epic, paradigm-shattering attempt to reconcile science and religion, GOD ACCORDING TO GOD. Writer/director Drew Hall’s supernatural thriller CONVERGENCE rather brilliantly conjures up a thought-provoking, at times quite unsettling vision of one (seemingly) forsaken corner of this post-death persistence.

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  • “AMERICAN HORROR PROJECT, VOLUME 1” (Blu-ray Review)

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    When it comes to art house entries into the genre, Arrow Video is truly going above and beyond to preserve the obscure and odd from throughout horror history. While their releases as of late have included more notorious films such as THE MUTILATOR, BLOOD & BLACK LACE and EATEN ALIVE!, Arrow Video has doubled down on their mission statement with their latest box set, a trio of vintage terror titles dubbed AMERICAN HORROR PROJECT, VOLUME 1. And as one might expect, Arrow Video has given each film the definitive high def treatment, complete with 2K restorations and enough special features to win over even the most jaded Blu-ray collector.

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  • “THE SERPENT & THE RAINBOW” (Blu-ray Review)

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    In the grand scheme of Wes Craven, THE SERPENT & THE RAINBOW is easily, pound for pound, one of the filmmaker’s best movies. Eerie, dread-inducing and far from the familiarity of slashers and serial killers, THE SERPENT & THE RAINBOW offers seriously engaging drama and incredibly beautiful production design on top of the mounting tension and macabre moments. And while THE SERPENT & THE RAINBOW is a favorite among many fright fans, the film has sadly taken quite some time to get to high definition, with Scream Factory taking up the mantle with their brand new Blu-ray set.

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  • “THE CURSE / CURSE II: THE BITE” (Blu-ray Review)

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    The ‘80s was a weird, wild time in the world of horror filmmaking. Imaginative, FX-heavy films were in vogue, most of which were gleefully R-rated and contingent on shock value to grab the insatiable horror audience. Likewise, the genre was sequel-crazy during the decade, franchising any and every horror property that made a buck, even if they were connected via title alone. And there’s no better example of both categories of ‘80s horror than in THE CURSE and THE CURSE II, a pair of genre oddities that are making their high-definition debut from Scream Factory this week.

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  • “THE VINCENT PRICE COLLECTION III” (Blu-ray Review)

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    While Scream Factory pours their heart and soul into any box set they release, the boutique distributor’s pride and joy would be their series of VINCENT PRICE COLLECTIONS. Having already brought such classic films such as HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL, THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES, WITCHFINDER GENERAL and more to high definition via these sets, the VINCENT PRICE COLLECTION series have been a fitting tribute to the performer’s esteemed oeuvre with enough unique special features to impress even the most ardent collector. Now, Scream Factory is back with their third VINCENT PRICE COLLECTION, although with many of Price’s classics already on the HD market, this selection is going deeper into his filmography with more obscure titles and extras to boot.

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  • “THE MUTILATOR” (Blu-ray Review)

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    One of the benefits of being a relatively younger fright fan is being able to see the cult classics and eerie obscurities of the ’80s for the first time in this day and age. Whether it’s insane fright fare like BLOOD RAGE, the campy fun of MADMAN or the ridiculous proto-slashers of BLOOD AND LACE, they certainly don’t make ’em how they used to, and without the baggage of the bigger franchises looming over them as they must have upon their initial release, these bad boys often take a life of their own. And somewhere among the weirder horror offerings is THE MUTILATOR, a brutal oddity that, for all of its pacing and dialogue issues, more than makes up for it in the gore department with a stylish scene or two to help keep things interesting.

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