LOGO
  • “THE TRIANGLE” (Film Review)

    ,,

    When it comes to the POV/Found Footage-esque films, it’s safe to say that, for the most part, we’ve seen it all by now. Sure, squeezed in between a dozen or so awful entries, there can be a hidden gem and when said gem is found, it’s an experience, to say the least. The hard part comes in the brutal fact that as the market is flooded with countless knockoffs of what’s hot at the moment, finding those films which make you sit on the edge of your seat, enthralled, become harder to find. So was the case in the Adam Stilwell, Andrew Rizzo, Adam Pitman, David Blair and Nathaniel Peterson-helmed film THE TRIANGLE.

    Read more »
  • “WOLF CREEK: THE SERIES” (TV Review)

    ,,

    It could have been very easy for the creators of WOLF CREEK to go the FREDDY’S NIGHTMARES route, positing tails of outback terror connected by modern horror icon Mick Taylor. After all, star John Jarratt is so perfect in the role of the sadistic, crude killer that it’s almost criminal to not give him the platform to perform on the WOLF CREEK series. However, perhaps the reason WOLF CREEK’s TV continuation works as well as it does is that it understands the narrative value of Taylor, and by allowing Jarratt to take a backseat to the story of his vengeance-bound victim, the series builds upon the seedy world of WOLF CREEK, in which Taylor is far from the only danger lurking in the darkness.

    Read more »
  • “THE DISAPPOINTMENTS ROOM” (Film Review)

    ,,

    After it’s long shelving and quiet release this week from distributor Rogue, it would be easy to write-off D.J. Caruso’s THE DISAPPOINTMENTS ROOM sight unseen. But as it turns out, THE DISAPPOINTMENTS ROOM is far from a disappointment in-and-of itself, barring the final few minutes, but rather a fright film with a bit of an identity crisis. In that regards, one shouldn’t be surprise if they fall in and out of love with THE DISAPPOINTMENTS ROOM during its lean 90-minute runtime, but at the end of the day, this particular flick operates as the modern equivalent of an “Old Dark House” melodrama, and hints at real promise within Wentworth Miller’s screenplay.

    Read more »
  • “CELL” (Blu-ray Review)

    ,,

    There’s something quite frightening about walking down the street and seeing the endless amount of zombies, all staring at their cell phones and these days, all glued to whichever devices help them catch the latest Pokémon. We live in such a technologically reliant society that for most of us (I’m guilty of this myself), we forget to stop and take in the scenery, pay attention to our loved ones and every other daily ritual which seems trivial when you have the most recent phone or tablet to run your life.

    Read more »
  • “THE DEVIL’S DOLLS” (Film Review)

    ,,

    Drilling you right in the temple from the very beginning, Padraig Reynolds’ THE DEVIL’S DOLLS is a film that gives you one of the most intense openings in years. Feeling more like THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE than most TCM sequels did, the film opens with an insane murderer keeping his self-made “worry” dolls in a box and picking up a large drill before running after a woman who is able to escape being held captive. This intense opening scene shows more intensity and horror in its first ten minutes than most films do in their entire running time. It keeps you on the edge right up until the killer is taken out by Matt (Christopher Wiehl), a police officer whose work is his obsession. Matt is a detective so obsessed with being a cop that his obsession has led to a divorce and a fractured relationship with his daughter, Chloe (JUNE star Kennedy Brice).

    Read more »
  • “CLOWN” (Blu-ray Review)

    ,,

    A film whose humble beginnings stem from a trailer to a film that didn’t exist, the Jon Watts-helmed CLOWN is a testament to the power of imagination and persistence. Following HOSTEL/THE GREEN INFERNO director Eli Roth discovering the faux trailer and deciding to produce a real version, the film was shelved for a couple of years before finally making its debut this past week. With its recent Blu-ray release, we’ve been given a film that is not only entertaining but also one of the most impressive genre debuts in quite some time.

    Read more »
  • BiFan 2016: “AUTOHEAD” (Film Review)

    ,,

    As a general rule, I don’t call myself much of a fan of found-footage horror. At the height of hype for the original BLAIR WITCH PROJECT, I’d been enamored with the idea. Framing your narrative as a mysterious and dangerous bit of film that someone found in the wild, leftover from some horror or tragedy, is a great concept for generating some sincere unease. Of course, I wasn’t the only one who thought so, and the result was innumerable shaky, blurry, cobbled-together films that lean on the found-footage conceit to excuse plot holes or a shoddy aesthetic. With any rule, however, there are always exceptions, and this writer was pleased to discover that Indian faux-documentary AUTOHEAD is one of them.

    Read more »
  • “DON’T BREATHE” (Film Review)

    ,,

    I doubt you’ll find a film this year more appropriately titled than Fede Alvarez’s DON’T BREATHE. As simplistic as it is suspenseful, DON’T BREATHE is undoubtedly an intense and unpredictable thrill-ride, one that will literally take your breath away during its numerous incredible set pieces. And for the many horror fans who complain about the horror genre’s penchant for the familiar and unoriginal, DON’T BREATHE is a well-needed gut punch of cinematic studio horror that is unafraid to throw petrifying punches outside of the jump scare landscape.

    Read more »
  • BiFan 2016: “KARATE KILL” (Film Review)

    ,,

    There are some films that take a while to digest, to process, to parse. Sometimes it can days or weeks after a viewing (or multiple viewings), to form an opinion. Then sometimes, even that opinion changes with time, ephemeral and difficult-to-define feelings for a piece of art fluctuating based on moods and seasons. Other times, you can form a pretty safe assessment based on the first ten minutes, or even a trailer. In some rare cases, a film is so free from pretense, so upfront with its motives and influences, you can get a pretty good idea just from looking at the poster. KARATE KILL is one such movie.

    Read more »
  • BiFan 2016: “THE TAG-ALONG” (Film Review)

    ,,

    There’s a fine line between mystery and ambiguity, and the use of both in horror filmmaking both come with their own unique risks and rewards. With the right balance of mystery, a horror film can use suspense and misdirection to change the audience’s perception of a character or plot point in a way that feels thrilling and earned. However, the use of ambiguity has to be more careful, as a plot point or story beat that’s left open-ended can make the audience question anything else that could be open for interpretation. But when synchronized, mystery and ambiguity can be almost weaponized by a filmmaker, offering something genuinely engaging while continually pulling back to curtain to hint at a deeper, darker picture.

    Read more »
  • BiFan 2016: “VILLMARK ASYLUM” (Film Review)

    ,,

    The problem with playing it safe in the horror genre is the risk of becoming too damn predictable. Sure, interesting characters, solid FX, and effective scares can go a long way for a simple, if terribly familiar narrative. But in the case of VILLMARK ASYLUM, staying risk-free costs the film any truly scary surprises, offering a sadly uninspired cinematic affair that pales in comparison to its 2003 predecessor.

    Read more »
  • BiFan 2016: “WE ARE THE FLESH” (Film Review)

    ,,

    When it comes to transgressive cinema, there are imitators and then there is the real deal. In the former category falls films that too often rely on their inspirations and influences, painting a hollow recreation of yesteryear’s shocking cinema. Likewise, imitators also will often go for the easy shocks and “hot-button” subject matter without exploring what they’re saying, why they’re saying it, and- most importantly- how it fits organically within the story they’re telling. Hence, when you do encounter the real deal, it’s something you feel from every frame of the film as it breaks down your expectations and barrels into your comfort zone with truly disturbing, provocative storytelling.

    Read more »
Back to Top