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    “MR. JONES” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Seemingly the most divisive midnight/horror offering at the Tribeca Film Festival this year, MR. JONES has garnered reaction across the spectrum. What’s odd though is how in polite conversation, most have refrained from mentioning just how admirably weird Karl Mueller’s sort-of found footage feature debut gets in its second half. MR. JONES is a strange beast and for better or worse—or however you come out of it—refreshing in that it’s a fairly unique, Lynchian addition to the current glut of docu-style terror.

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    “BIG BAD WOLVES” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Two years ago, Israeli writer/directors Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado provided an out-of-nowhere highlight of the Tribeca Film Festival with RABIES, their multiple-twisty variation on killer-in-the-woods standards. Now they’re back at the fest with the world premiere of BIG BAD WOLVES, which isn’t quite as narratively knotty but proves the duo equally adept at a more brute-forceful brand of thriller.

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    “THE MACHINE” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Some films just look cool. Caradog James’ future-set cold war tale THE MACHINE is massively so. From an aesthetic standpoint it is slickly designed and beautiful on what’s surely a modest budget. Temperature-wise, it exists in a seeming eternally harsh space of overcast skies, nighttime and enormous, often barely-holding up warehouses and labs. Star Caity Lotz is fluid and incredible in her movement. But what’s truly coolest is the ensuing warm, radical spirit that reveals itself throughout it all.

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    “FRANKENSTEIN’S ARMY” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Fans old enough to have unsuspectingly walked into NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD or THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE during their original runs have described feeling like they were in the hands of madmen, directors who had gone off the deep end and were taking the audience with them. I won’t make claims to future similar classic status for FRANKENSTEIN’S ARMY just yet, but parts of it gave me a similar lunatics-have-overtaken-the-asylum sensation.

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    “DARK TOUCH” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    In DARK TOUCH, European director and provocateur Marina de Van transfers her now recurring theme of identity crisis and unsure footing from grown women to a young girl still in pre-pubescence. It’s this pre-pubescence that’s taken terrifying advantage of; the repercussions of which manifest themselves in a fury of psychic power and telekinesis. Of course, CARRIE will be and is a touchstone for many in the case of this Ireland-set horror story, but whereas that tale explores the fear of oncoming womanhood, DARK TOUCH is an unnerving look at it forced on someone far, far too young.

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    “SCARY MOVIE V” (Movie Review)

    First there were SCARY MOVIE and SCARY MOVIE 2, in which a few good laughs got mired in endless crudity and bodily-function gags. Then there were SCARY MOVIE 3 and SCARY MOVIE 4, in which things improved under the stewardship of AIRPLANE/NAKED GUN vet David Zucker. Now comes the latest installment, which feels very much like parts of SCARY MOVIE 5 and SCARY MOVIE 6 were slapped together into one movie.

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    “ANTIVIRAL” (Movie Review)

    [This review was initially published out of the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2012, it is reposted below in light of the film's theatrical and VOD release.]

    Any film bearing the surname Cronenberg on its credit block will be of interest to FANGORIA, and ANTIVIRAL—which had its North American premiere at the current Toronto International Film Festival following its world premiere at Cannes this past summer—is indeed a Cronenberg joint. Specifically, it’s the first picture from David’s son Brandon. Does the apple fall far? 

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    “EVIL DEAD” (Mike’s Movie Review)

    EVIL DEAD die-hards can calm their concerns—the remake of Sam Raimi’s classic is good enough that, at a certain point, you might forget it’s a remake. Recapturing the essence of its predecessor without slavishly aping its style, the new movie stands on its own and provides buckets of bloody fun.

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    “ROOM 237” (Movie Review)

    Maybe you hold onto one yourself? Some pet theory about a particular film’s hidden patterns, symbolism, subtext or allegory? Undertones that fly past most viewers but, once uncovered and analysed, cannot be ignored? ROOM 237 (in select theaters and on VOD today) is a unique and deceptively simple documentary that features five different people attempting to explain what they perceive to be the true meaning behind Stanley Kubrick’s film of THE SHINING.

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    “DARK BLOOD” (Movie Review)

    “If you want something enough, you must will it. If you’re obsessed enough, you will get the object of your desire.”

    So declares a tortured desert eccentric named Boy—portrayed by a fiery River Phoenix in his final screen role—to the pair of marooned Hollywood jetsetters he’s holding captive in a pivotal scene from DARK BLOOD, but the character might as well have been whispering through the celluloid ether to director George Sluizer, who recently (and with an effort that can only be described as herculean) plucked the film from the purgatory of fractional incompleteness in which it has lingered unseen for twenty years and made it a (qualified) whole.

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    “Strange Frame” (Movie Review)

    I really wanted to like STRANGE FRAME. It has a cast that’s made up of some of the best known names in the exploitation and voice acting field – Tim Curry (ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW, LEGEND), Claudia Black (FARSCAPE, STARGATE SG-1), Ron Glass (FIREFLY), Tara Strong (almost every superhero cartoon show), Cree Summer (ditto those superhero cartoons), George Takei (the original STAR TREK), Juliet Landau (BUFFY, ANGEL), Alan Tudyk (FIREFLY, V, DOLLHOUSE), Michael Dorn (STAR TREK THE NEXT GENERATION, DEEP SPACE NINE) and Claudia Christian (BABYLON 5, HIGHLANDER).

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