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    “A THOUSAND CUTS” (DVD/Blu-ray Review)

    by: Ken Hanley on: 2013-01-23 21:26:11

    As a reviewer, there is a level of professional integrity one must consider when reviewing a film whose quality beckons for a complete analytical annihilation. However, my responsibility is to you, the reader and potential customer, who may be drawn in by the DVD or Blu-ray cover that egregiously misuses such phrases as “all star cast,” “unrated director’s cut” and “edge-of-your-seat,” and shows off bound hands and bloody knives.

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    “WE ARE WHAT WE ARE” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Popular opinion on genre remakes tends to be that they’re soulless product, meant to capitalize on a mildly recognizable title and often hampered by studio notes. Audiences, rightfully so, often ask that if they remain a constant, filmmakers could at least be granted the space to be creative and make it their own. In an age that sees more rehashes than ever, Jim Mickle’s American interpretation of Jorge Michel Grau’s Mexican horror film, WE ARE WHAT WE ARE could be a standard going forward.

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    “IN FEAR” (Sundance Movie Review)

    UK director Jeremy Lovering’s feature debut was developed and filmed unconventionally. He kept much of the story—its twists and turns and frights and games— from his two leads, only revealing the entirety to Allen Leech; he who plays the one playing tricks. While the average moviegoer rarely needs such back story, viewing the film with context in this case feels a tad more necessary. Although Lovering’s search for verisimilitude was not in vain, it does materialize in both grounded, raw performance and a strong sense that no one has any idea of what’s going on.

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    “V/H/S 2″ (Sundance Movie Review)

    Where V/H/S was a raw, lo-fi and frightening odyssey via POV, its sequel is—and from the very outset—bigger, weirder and even reflective of its predecessor. In the first few minutes alone, V/H/S 2 runs through almost every format previously explored, from spy camera to camcorder to iChat; and almost every perspective as well, from investigative to voyeuristic (often both at the same time) to daily doings. And while less traditionally dreadful, where it all leads is infinitely more thrilling.

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    “SIGHTSEERS” (Movie Review)

    With Ben Wheatley—one of the most electric and prolific new filmmakers working—and stars/writers Alice Lowe and Steve Oram crafting a chronicle of new lovers on holiday, the last thing to expect is anything resembling a traditional relationship drama. And that’s the last thing you get. But within Chris and Tina’s mad love, their pencil museum visits, their vicious murders and hysteric jaunt through the countryside is real poignancy about the peaks and valleys of intimate connection and letting go of long-held restraint.

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    “DREDD” (DVD/Blu-ray Review)

    by: Chris Alexander on: 2013-01-11 20:11:43

    Where do we point the finger for the theatrical failing of
    DREDD? An invisible marketing campaign? The hard R? The association with the
    previous, lunk-headed 1995 big screen adaptation of the beloved British cult
    comic book property?

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    Recap: “AMERICAN HORROR STORY 211, SPILT MILK”

    It’s unclear whether “Spilt Milk” can be judged on its own. As AMERICAN HORROR STORY begins to wrap up its second season in earnest (and not just its typical stop-start-reset fashion) it may be integral to view this eleventh episode of ASYLUM alongside the final two that follow. That could be the key to figuring out whether, in the end, this all works. Because right now, after a truly head-tilting opening in which Dylan McDermott’s present day Bloody Face visits with a lactating prostitute, who can really be sure of anything?

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    “THE DEAD INSIDE” (DVD Review)

    One of the many struggles of independent horror filmmaking is finding a voice to attract your target audience, whether it’s devoting whatever budget you have to a bloodier body count or opting for a quiet, atmospheric tension as a result of limited resources. However, from the oversaturated opening credits onward, THE DEAD INSIDE prides itself on defying expectations, offering surprises within its low-budget boundaries that make it a unique and satisfying genre offering.

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