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    Recap: “AMERICAN HORROR STORY 213, Madness Ends”

    by: Samuel Zimmerman on: 2013-01-25 23:32:40

    Possibly the most striking thing about how AMERICAN HORROR
    STORY: ASYLUM has wrapped itself up is that, in a show and season so imbued
    with a love of and homage to cinema, “Madness Ends” really went to bat for the
    power of television. Really, Ryan Murphy’s extended, warped odyssey through a Massachusetts
    mental institution could not have been told any other way. Brutal, soap operatic,
    involved, indulgent and even massively transformed from beginning to end,
    ASYLUM laid down with grace via a 60 MINUTES-esque sit down and a horrifying
    exposé reminiscent of Geraldo Rivera’s own investigations of the squalor at
    Staten Island, New York’s Willowbrook State School.

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    “VIDEO DIARY OF A LOST GIRL” (Movie Review)

    by: Vivienne Vaughn on: 2013-01-25 15:49:10

    VIDEO DIARY OF A LOST GIRL, the first feature directed by
    Lindsay Denniberg, is not made for the masses; it’s a completely bizarre,
    surrealistic art-house film that’s not quite comparable to anything, except perhaps Nobuhiko Obayashi’s 1977 horror phantasmagoria HOUSE.

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    “JUG FACE” (Slamdance Movie Review)

    There’s a weirdness to the circumstances of JUG FACE’s plot that doesn’t quite take hold of the entire film. That is to say, a bit disappointingly, that a movie about prophetic pottery, incestuous pregnancy and a pit that demands sacrifice is a lot more of a straightforward horror picture than it sounds.

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    “WRONG COPS” (Sundance Movie Review)

    by: Olivia Saperstein on: 2013-01-23 22:18:49

    Let’s make this clear: WRONG COPS is a party. Oh, and don’t worry,
    it’s appropriately blood-infused. While writer/director Quentin Dupieux (STEAK,
    RUBBER, WRONG) may deny the “experimental” classification, he is certainly
    known for his authentic filmmaking choices, so expect WRONG COPS to exceed all
    levels of dissidence.

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    “A THOUSAND CUTS” (DVD/Blu-ray Review)

    by: Ken Hanley on: 2013-01-23 21:26:11

    As a reviewer, there is a level of professional integrity one must consider when reviewing a film whose quality beckons for a complete analytical annihilation. However, my responsibility is to you, the reader and potential customer, who may be drawn in by the DVD or Blu-ray cover that egregiously misuses such phrases as “all star cast,” “unrated director’s cut” and “edge-of-your-seat,” and shows off bound hands and bloody knives.

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    “WE ARE WHAT WE ARE” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Popular opinion on genre remakes tends to be that they’re soulless product, meant to capitalize on a mildly recognizable title and often hampered by studio notes. Audiences, rightfully so, often ask that if they remain a constant, filmmakers could at least be granted the space to be creative and make it their own. In an age that sees more rehashes than ever, Jim Mickle’s American interpretation of Jorge Michel Grau’s Mexican horror film, WE ARE WHAT WE ARE could be a standard going forward.

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    “IN FEAR” (Sundance Movie Review)

    UK director Jeremy Lovering’s feature debut was developed and filmed unconventionally. He kept much of the story—its twists and turns and frights and games— from his two leads, only revealing the entirety to Allen Leech; he who plays the one playing tricks. While the average moviegoer rarely needs such back story, viewing the film with context in this case feels a tad more necessary. Although Lovering’s search for verisimilitude was not in vain, it does materialize in both grounded, raw performance and a strong sense that no one has any idea of what’s going on.

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    “V/H/S 2″ (Sundance Movie Review)

    Where V/H/S was a raw, lo-fi and frightening odyssey via POV, its sequel is—and from the very outset—bigger, weirder and even reflective of its predecessor. In the first few minutes alone, V/H/S 2 runs through almost every format previously explored, from spy camera to camcorder to iChat; and almost every perspective as well, from investigative to voyeuristic (often both at the same time) to daily doings. And while less traditionally dreadful, where it all leads is infinitely more thrilling.

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    “SIGHTSEERS” (Movie Review)

    With Ben Wheatley—one of the most electric and prolific new filmmakers working—and stars/writers Alice Lowe and Steve Oram crafting a chronicle of new lovers on holiday, the last thing to expect is anything resembling a traditional relationship drama. And that’s the last thing you get. But within Chris and Tina’s mad love, their pencil museum visits, their vicious murders and hysteric jaunt through the countryside is real poignancy about the peaks and valleys of intimate connection and letting go of long-held restraint.

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