LOGO
  • ,,

    “WITHER” (Movie Review)

    Whether WITHER positioned itself as a child of Sam Raimi’s iconic low budget debut or not, the lineage would be easy to trace. A group of friends, an old cabin in the woods, rampant possession and a particularly nasty air are all elements shared by Tommy Wiklund & Sonny Laguna’s latest and the 1981 all-timer THE EVIL DEAD. If WITHER doesn’t exactly measure up to its prominent stylistic influence (most homage doesn’t), it can’t be too heavily faulted. And hell, it’s not for lack of trying. For all its gore and grue, the Swedish tale of terror achieves its goal of being off-putting, but in all the wrong ways.  

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “HAROLD’S GOING STIFF” (Movie Review)

    The vast majority of the post-NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD zombie canon has conditioned audiences to accept, without question, the premise that if not somehow contained, the appearance of walking dead leads inexorably to apocalypse. Fast or slow, sentient or comatose, the zombies are not only coming to get poor Barbara in the graveyard—they’re out to decimate civilization.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Jess Franco’s “A VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD” (Blu-ray Review)

    Those that dismiss the elephantine and obsessive filmography of the late cinema slinger Jess Franco would be wise to sit down and absorb what might be his greatest film of the 1970s, if not his storied career: CHRISTINA, PRINCESS OF EROTICISM or, as it’s more commonly referred to as–including on the sleeve of Repemption/Kino Lorber’s superlative Blu-ray release–A VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “SATURDAY MORNING MYSTERY” (Movie Review)

    SATURDAY MORNING MYSTERY offers a tantalizing concept previously untouched by the genre: a grown-up, live-action, horror-movie take on SCOOBY-DOO. Spunky heroine Nancy (Ashley Spillers)—essentially a flesh-and-blood version of Velma—and her three pals Gwen (Josephine Decker), Chad (Adam Tate) and Floyd (Jonny Mars), who happen to bear a number of similarities to Daphne, Fred and Shaggy respectively, are paranormal investigators who cruise around solving mysteries with their dog Hamlet via an orange Volkswagen bus.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “YOU’RE NEXT” (Movie Review)

    It’s understandable if, as a viewer, you initially experience difficulty being eloquent when it comes to navigating and expressing thoughts on YOU’RE NEXT. If so, it’s because the literal buzzing you’re feeling upon its end leaves you with essentially one word: great.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD” (Short Film Review)

    Plenty of short films are made every minute and many of them find their way to our mailbox.  Some are unwatchable, some are passable, some—the rare jewels—are fantastic. Navin Ramaswaran’s crackerjack micro-thriller ONE MORE FOR THE ROAD careens wildly into the fantastic arena, smashing against the world, destroying and bursting into a superlative display of bloody 4th of July fireworks. Yes indeed… this little flick is one of the good ones.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Mario Bava’s “KIDNAPPED”: Confined in the Open Country (Blu-ray Review)

    Kino’s ongoing transfer of the work of Mario Bava to Blu-ray presents not only a celebration of the Italian master’s filmography, but a way to gorge and gain perspective on a filmmaker that’s gone on to influence so much. I did as such last year, upon release of BLACK SUNDAY, HATCHET FOR THE HONEYMOON and LISA & THE DEVIL. Viewing all three, spread throughout Bava’s career, in a vaccum (with Tim Lucas’ informed commentary accompanying) shone light on the more personal flourishes in Bava films. Namely, that his homebody nature and reticence to leave Italy became a theme of confinement to history, legacy, supernatural fate or psychological trauma. So, what happened when Bava got out?

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “APARTMENT 1303″ (Movie Review)

    For all save the tiniest minority of urban dwellers, compromises when it comes to securing decent living space are a fact of life; an intricate calculus weighing variables of location, price, relative state of decay, and security to see how close one can sneak up on the ideal.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “THE WORLD’S END” (Movie Review)

    Simply put: They’ve done it again. Just as they did with zombies in SHAUN OF THE DEAD and police action in HOT FUZZ, the Brit Pack of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost find lots of big laughs in the otherworldly invasion/apocalypse subgenre, while infusing THE WORLD’S END with brains and heart that help the humor stick.

    Read more »
Back to Top