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  • “DANGEROUS MEN” (Blu-ray Review)

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    In many ways, the Alamo Drafthouse brand has become a safe harbor for the odd, obscure and altogether ostracized film. While the Drafthouse Films distribution model has offered high-class art film, transgressive foreign fare and excursions into the absurd, Drafthouse locations around the country have hosted unique repertory screenings of classic and cult titles that can’t be found at your local multiplex. Yet nothing quite compares to how Drafthouse has help reinvigorate the “midnight movie” model, and by reintroducing films like MIAMI CONNECTION, ROAR and DANGEROUS MEN to the world, Drafthouse has helped cement a new legacy for insane and incompetently-made cinema otherwise lost in time.

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  • “SCHRAMM” (Blu-ray Review)

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    Expertly designed to cause discomfort, 1993’s SCHRAMM was the final feature-length film by notorious taboo-shatterer Jörg Buttgereit—a polite yet ferocious German director you may have read about here, as Cult Epics has been releasing one Blu-ray after another documenting his feared and revered career.

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  • “BRIDE OF RE-ANIMATOR” (Blu-ray Review)

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    It’s a damn shame that BRIDE OF RE-ANIMATOR doesn’t quite get the same respect as its predecessor. While the film doesn’t quite have the same pacing or script strength as RE-ANIMATOR as well as some other key elements (Barbara Crampton is dearly missed), the film is way better than its reputation would allow, which is even more impressive considering it’s Brian Yuzna’s sophomore directorial outing. And with some truly fantastic FX set pieces, solid horror comedy and a stellar cast at their behest, BRIDE OF RE-ANIMATOR is the kind of underrated sequel that deserves to be found again… and luckily, thanks to Arrow Video, horrorheads will have the opportunity to do so in its best home video release to date.

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  • “HARDCORE HENRY” (Movie Review)

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    HARDCORE HENRY was originally called just HARDCORE, the title change presumably effected lest anyone mistake it for pornography. Yet that association is entirely appropriate; the movie is a soulless, pointless glorification of the taking of human life, to the point where it makes you wonder why you ever enjoyed violent movies.

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  • “THE HALLOW” (Blu-ray Review)

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    Back when this writer first experienced Corin Hardy’s THE HALLOW at the sorely-missed Stanley Film Festival, I felt as if I was in the midst of seeing a striking, master-class genre filmmaker on the rise. The careful twist on genre tropes, the engaging visual style, the inclusion of Irish mythology and the undeniably phenomenal marriage of practical and digital effects all pointed to one of the most promising feature debuts in recent memory, reminiscent of such contemporary horror masters Guillermo del Toro and Neil Marshall. Yet while the film picked up critical acclaim in its limited release via IFC Midnight last year, this writer hopes that Scream Factory’s new impressive new Blu-ray release will give horrorheads the monstrous goodness in stunning 1080p High Definition.

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  • “BATES MOTEL: Season 4, Episode 4” (TV Review)

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    The fourth episode of BATES MOTEL opens with Norman recounting all of the people that “mother” has killed while the voice of his dead father telling him that Norma killed him is running in his head. When Norman refuses his meds, the nurse tells him that if he doesn’t take them, he will be locked into his room until a resident nurse comes to see him. While the rules of this institution remain a bit murky, the logic here remains problematic, but that’s far from Norman’s biggest problem this week.

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  • “THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS” (Film Review)

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    As much sense as it may make to a marketing executive or producer, having the name of a horror icon attached to your film is actually somewhat of a risky proposition. By associating a film with someone who is known and beloved by genre films, expectations will understandably be raised, which could work as a double-edged sword if those standards are not met. And in the case of Nick Simon’s THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS, having that attachment be the final credit in the prolific career of Wes Craven (who served as executive producer) is an even larger shadow to shine through in the eyes of horror enthusiasts.

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  • “MY BEST FRIEND’S EXORCISM” (Book Review)

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    Though we are steeped deep in gloriously gonzo unorthodoxy for more than 100 pages before the musclebound 20something self-described practitioner of “puke and rebuke” de-demonization turns up in Grady Hendrix’s MY BEST FRIEND’S EXORCISM, it is nonetheless hilarious just how absurdly far from the Father Merrin tree the character falls.

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  • “DECAY” (Film Review)

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    Joseph Wartnerchaney’s feature debut, DECAY follows the romance between a middle-aged loner, and the corpse of a local teenage girl. This concept will encourage comparisons to NEKROMANTIK, but the character Jonathan, to whom DECAY devotes its full attention, has little in common with the Crimson Climaxer of the German cult classic. Instead of dissecting a crazed necro-rapist, we are shanghaied along a one-month transformation to Jonathan’s self-awareness. These abstractions make demands from the audience that will undoubtedly frustrate certain viewers – perhaps a necrophile looking to pop in a sick flick and… crack open a cold one? On the other hand, viewers who are willing to put forth the effort may find a horror greater than the rape and murder they were likely expecting.

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