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    “RESURRECTION: Season One” (DVD Review)

    Robin Campillo’s 2004 French horror film LES REVENANTS (anglicized as THEY CAME BACK) is a confounding, beautiful picture. A sort of anti-zombie film in which inexplicably, dressed all in white, the dead return to a small French town en masse and are reunited with their disoriented families. It’s a slow, sad and moody film that never goes for cheap scares and instead builds tension by suggesting that the dead are connected somehow and their motives are not entirely virtuous.

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    “THE DANCE OF REALITY” (Film Review)

    Experiencing a new film from a great, veteran filmmaker is always one of wariness and excitement, especially when you devote the time to see their work in the theater among equally nervous fans. Even understanding that the greater experience of filmmaking often makes master cinematic storytellers into bitter and passionless journeymen, every cinephile turns to their inner skeptic that hopes for another riveting return to form. And when it comes to genre movies, these filmmakers are all the more volatile considering just how important imagination is to the construct of horrific or fantastical cinema.

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    “MARIANNE” (Movie Review)

    The original posters for MARIANNE, the debut feature by Swedish writer/director/producer Filip Tegstedt (see one below), are redolent of classic ’80s VHS covers, and suggest a project born of nostalgia for the shriekers of that era. Instead, the movie, now available on VOD, harks back to an earlier tradition of quiet supernatural dramas.

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    “THE DOLL” (CD Review)

    The latest album by horror auteur Dante Tomaselli, THE DOLL is the soundtrack to his in-development film of the same name (see details here), and a creepy, nightmarish auditory journey that will immediately unsettle anyone who listens to it. The disc is catchy at times and perfectly frightful at others—a hallucinogenic trip to a dark and uncomfortable place.

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    Shadowvision: “From Dusk Till Dawn”

    Welcome to Shadowvision, a regular column in which Fangoria.com revisits modern horror films in black-and-white. The purpose is to analyze these films through a new lens, seeing if the classically informed viewing experience will give a new angle to familiar images. If you’d like to watch along at home, it’s simple: go into your TV settings and desaturate the picture completely, then adjust the contrast and brightness to fit either standard or high definition.

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    Fango Flashback: “SORCERER” (1977)

    Following years of distribution limbo, William Friedkin’s 1977 box-office misfire SORCERER finally sees the light of day again this spring, beginning with a special one-week engagement (in a DCP restoration overseen by the director) at New York City’s Film Forum (209 West Houston; [212] 727-8110) from May 30 to June 5. Of his celluloid catalogue, Friedkin considers SORCERER his most accomplished work (he says he wouldn’t change a frame), better than his THE FRENCH CONNECTION and THE EXORCIST! You can judge for yourself when the thriller, a remake of Henri-Georges’ Clouzot’s French classic THE WAGES OF FEAR, burns up repertory houses decades after its initial debut.

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    “PENNY DREADFUL” (TV Pilot Review)

    In Showtime’s long-running efforts to bring horror to premium cable, they’ve often mistaken what works so well about horror: actually being scary. While DEXTER brought bountiful blood and MASTERS OF HORROR occasionally lived up to its title, Showtime traded suspense for presumed intensity while exploiting the freedoms outside of the limits of broadcast television restrictions. The atmospheric PENNY DREADFUL however, just may be the series to pull Showtime into more serious horror territory, as long as future episodes make good on the potential of the impressively creepy pilot.

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    Brian De Palma’s “SISTERS” (Arrow Blu-ray Review)

    SISTERS just might be the most important movie in Brian De Palma’scareer. Though his first feature MURDER A LA MOD laid down hints of what was to come, SISTERS was the first time De Palma ditched his satirical, political, Godard-influenced romps in favor of self-consciously accepting Hitchcock’s crown as a new master of suspense. That’s not to say that the movie is serious, of course. De Palma’s deep appreciation and understanding of Hitchcock extended to Hitch’s dark humor and refined sense of irony. So, what Pauline Kael’s once famously referred to as De Palma’s “alligator grin” is in full effect.

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