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    “CHILLING VISIONS: 5 SENSES OF FEAR” (DVD/Blu-ray Review)

    With the readiness of digital filmmaking in the independent world, and the growing number of unique voices attracted to the creative freedom of horror, there’s been no shortage of anthology projects arising in the genre world. These projects are affordable, challenging and often strong showcases for young, emerging voices—essentially collections of calling cards, as well as opportunities to show off resourcefulness and ambition under time and finance confines, without the overbearing pressure of feature filmmaking. This year has seen the release of several impressive omnibus movies, including THE ABCs OF DEATH, V/H/S/2 and now CHILLING VISIONS: 5 SENSES OF FEAR.

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    Fango Flashback: “NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE” (1979)

    Dreadful, ambitious and philosophical, Werner Herzog’s NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE begins today at New York’s Film Forum (203 W. Houston Street; (212) 727-8110) for an exclusive two-week run in its alternate, unseen German-language form. Sporting a new 35-mm print of Herzog’s slow-burning and eerie reimagining of F.W. Murnau’s classic film from the Bleeding Lights Film Group, Film Forum will be running the film until Thursday, November 7th, and in fact, on Monday, November 4th, the 9:15 screening will be preceded by a special screening of Murnau’s film, accompanied by a live piano score by Steve Sterner.

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    “THE FROZEN GROUND” (DVD/Blu-ray Review)

    THE FROZEN GROUND has a few things we at FANGORIA really dig. One is gruesome staged murders, and another is a ratcheting aura of dread. And the third is Nicolas Cage. We put him on our cover back on issue #310 for myriad reasons—the main one being that Cage is a horror-film freak, and always brings a kind of supernatural delirium to even his most pedestrian roles. Love him or loathe him, there’s no one else like him. We fall firmly in the former category, of course…

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    “THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM” (1961) (Scream Factory Blu-ray Review)

    As a producer, Roger Corman has made some truly terrible movies. As a result, his name is more likely to recall a crappy Syfy monster picture, or even an 80s ALIEN ripoff than anything of true merit. That’s a shame, because he’s actually quite a fine director with an incredibly smart approach to making movies that I wish even one-tenth of the major filmmakers working today would follow. Corman did “crazy” things, like plan the shots, and discuss characters with his actors before shooting, bringing everyone on the same page and keeping on-set tension and issues to a bare minimum (they also had completed scripts before that point, another thing that would be too much to ask for nowadays). 

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    “THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER”: The Best Film About Meeting Your Girlfriend’s Family

    Art changes. THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, while ostensibly the same film it was in 1960, has become something else entirely for this viewer. Consumed as a teenager by reverence of its icons—Vincent Price and Roger Corman—USHER was not so much affecting as it simply was “essential watching.” Playing on Turner Classic, it was something that had to be seen and in turn, there was the thought that that was enough. HOUSE OF USHER didn’t properly digest. Or maybe, I didn’t know how to.

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    “CARRIE” (2013; Movie Review)

    Among the reasons cited for giving Stephen King’s CARRIE another cinematic whirl, one of the most prominent has been the rise of bullying as a concern since Brian De Palma’s 1976 adaptation. And yet it’s when the new version leaves the teen milieu and focuses on Carrie’s home life that it’s at its strongest.

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    “SCHISM” (Screamfest Movie Review)

    Los Angeles’ Screamfest has become known as a place for indie films that might otherwise struggle for screenings to not only have a theatrical showing, but also catch the eyes of Hollywood’s major distributors. This year, the talk of the festival has been Adam Gierasch’s SCHISM, which screened this past Saturday night to a packed house. This reviewer attended without knowing anything about the film or what to expect, and can now safely say that it’s shocking, disturbing and possibly one of the best indie films so far this year.

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    ALL NIGHT HORROR MARATHON: “THE OUTING” (Scream Factory DVD Review)

    In the early 80s, the slasher was king. So much so that studios were barely making any other kinds of horror movies.  But as with all trends, it died out thanks to the resurgence of monster and supernaturally-tinged movies that offered big budget, state of the art FX, and leaving producers without the money to compete with the likes of THE FLY and The LOST BOYS little choice but to stick to the (cheaper) slasher movie template.  But in many of these mid/late 80s cases, such as THE OUTING (aka THE LAMP, more on that soon), they would toss in a monster or some sort of possession angle to stick out a bit and avoid being just another “outdated” slasher movie, even while sticking rigidly to its formula: a bunch of kids being picked off one by one, leaving the smartest girl to face off and defeat the villain. 

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    “NIGHT TRAIN TO TERROR” (DVD Review)

    Within its opening three minutes, the 1985 bizarro horror anthology film NIGHT TRAIN TO TERROR segues from a choreographed New Wave dance number—think the FLASHDANCE wardrobe department projectile vomiting across the set of a 1980s LOVERBOY video—to a grandiloquent debate over human freewill between a Count Dracula-ish Satan and a God so ridiculously archetypal he makes George Burns’ turn in OH, GOD! look like Linda Blair in THE EXORCIST.

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