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    “THE DAMNED” (Movie Review)

    Why would an inn located in the deepest, remote wilds of Colombia have the very American-Southwest name of Gallows Hill? Perhaps that concern led GALLOWS HILL to be retitled THE DAMNED, or maybe that generic new moniker was chosen to reflect the familiarity of the movie itself, a smattering of creatively creepy moments notwithstanding.

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    “THE QUIET ONES” (Blu-ray Review)

    Follwing their comeback in 2008, Hammer Films has certainly aimed to live up to their legacy of horror with dignity. In the tradition of their classics, the company set its mind on films that didn’t focus on body count as much as they did on the actual story. It was befitting that their first endeavor would be an impressive remake of LET THE RIGHT ONE IN, entitled LET ME IN, and would find their greatest success in the incredibly creepy adaptation of THE WOMAN IN BLACK.

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    “DYS-” (Fantasia Movie Review)

    The title of Maude Michaud’s DYS-, as defined in an opening text screen, is meant as a diminutive of “dysfunction,” of which there is certainly plenty on screen. But where the film’s central relationship is concerned, the movie could easily be called DIS-, for “dismissive” or “disassociate.”

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    “RAGE” (Movie Review)

    RAGE’s hook is in its title. Yes, that hook is obvious in that it rhymes with the surname of its star. And that’s no coincidence. Cage signed on to RAGE when it was called TOKAREV, a name that suits its story best and yet would no doubt be a nightmare to market (a Tokarev is a Russian handgun). So instead, the middle-management suits retitled it RAGE to cater to the ever-expanding Nicolas Cage internet-based cult, directly alluding to the web meme that sees Cage channeling Billy Corgan.

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    “THE HOUSE AT THE END OF TIME” (Fantasia Movie Review)

    A cleverly constructed horror film, Alejandro Hidalgo’s THE HOUSE AT THE END OF TIME plays like a surprising short story on a rainy evening. A patient, reflective work that’s less concerned with ghosts than with how we haunt ourselves, the Venezuelan feature pores over the nature of regret and personal slights, and comes to a mature conclusion in the process.

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