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    Stream to Scream: Lucio Fulci’s “THE HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY”

    As many fright fans already know, FANGORIA offers a great selection of gruesome movies, old and new, for free at our Hulu channel. To give you a better idea of what’s available, FANGORIA is taking in-depth looks at some of the channel’s terrifying titles with Stream to Scream. Today: Dr. Freudstein, Bob and Lucio Fulci’s THE HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY.

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    “VAMPIRE ACADEMY” (Movie Review)

    VAMPIRE ACADEMY didn’t screen for critics, and seeing it for review purposes risked the awkwardness of being the only adult male in a theater full of teenage girls. As it happened, the show I attended was nearly deserted, which posed another kind of disadvantage: Perhaps a young fan of the source novel could have explained to me what the hell was going on.

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    “NURSE 3D” (Movie Review)

    There’s a point in the long-delayed psycho thriller NURSE 3D where our anti-heroine, the deranged and lovestruck RN Abby Russell hisses, in hard-boiled noir-tinted voice over, that she “ate” the protagonist’s “ass” and  “fingered her to three orgasms.” It’s a delightfully off-color passage, one whose effect defines the lurid appeal of co-writer/director Douglas Aarniokoski’s sex-soaked shocker. After you get past the frisson of the pornographic wordplay, you jump to a tension-breaking laugh, before locking in a state of mild arousal (and really, what living organism wouldn’t be aroused by the lady playing Abby, Amazonian actress Paz de la Huerta?) and then, after running this gamut of sensation, you’re also left with the feeling that maybe the movie is just low-grade trash. Maybe it’s all beneath your otherwise sophisticated cinematic palette. But by the time you seriously start believing that, something explicitly violent and sexually outrageous has happened and you know what? You just don’t give a damn.

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    “DEAD SNOW; RED VS. DEAD” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Fake it till you make it; whether you put any stock in the old adage or not, it seems to have worked wonders for Norwegian filmmaker, Tommy Wirkola. Having broken through with a film based on a great concept that rarely results in something great (Nazi Zombies), Wirkola had cultivated a true fanbase. Still, and without discounting the undoubtedly hard work that goes into crafting a feature film, the director received much (justified) criticism for over-relying on stylistic influence and homage, particularly to the comedic horror of Sam Raimi and early Peter Jackson. In the intervening five years however—which saw him hit Hollywood with the goofy good time HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS—the filmmaker seems to have honed his horror-comedy craft, developing his own style, confronting his past shortcomings and delivering a film both worthy of its base idea and a packed house.

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    “A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT” (Sundance Movie Review)

    In Bad City, evil is relative. The fictional Iranian town, which exists only in a dreamy, anamorphic black-and-white, houses a small population which runs the spectrum of its namesake quality. And who’s to say who is worse than anyone else? Writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour is. Is a sleazy, coked-up, aggressive pimp any more terrible than who he employs? Is the silent vampire stalking the streets any less terrible because we love her?  Well, yes, but not in light of their actions. In A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, the embodiment of evil is lack of connection.

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    “KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM” (Movie Review)

    Reviewing KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM puts one in a situation that has become depressingly familiar: Having to address the movie that’s there instead of the movie it once was, could and should have been. The much-discussed postproduction woes are abundantly evident in the final product, though the silver lining is that, for horror fans anyway, KNIGHTS gets a little better as it goes along.

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    “WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Is it the cyclical nature of things that’s responsible for one of our most overexposed monsters to return in two revelatory films at 2014’s Sundance? Jim Jarmusch’s ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE finds almost everything vampires have embodied in cinema in a lyrical, self-aware hangout led by two of our most poetic and appropriately vampiric actors, Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton. Meanwhile, Taika Waititi and Jermaine Clement’s brilliantly comedic WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS also encompasses most everything considered a vampire archetype, but in what’s easily one of the funniest horror-comedies in ages. Where plenty of morose vampires have contemplated their endless existence, these four bloodsucking flatmates in New Zealand attempt to keep up with it all, and give the viewer a gory, goofy time doing so.

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    “THE VOICES” (Sundance Movie Review)

    What’s the worst thing you’ve ever laughed at? It’s doubtful that THE VOICES tops it sure, but Marjane Satrapi’s film is playing with a similar sentiment in its pop-color focus on a mentally imbalanced man (Ryan Reynolds) spurred to kill by his talking cat. Awash with pink factory machinery, bright yellow windbreakers, chatty severed heads and cheery disposition utterly twisting the grim, gruesome content out of whack, THE VOICES is surely not for everyone. Those with a predilection for a little prodding outside their comfort zone and a willingness to chuckle at some terrible things will likely find it a tasteless, special little exercise.

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    “OUTPOST: RISE OF THE SPETSNAZ” (Movie Review)

    Despite being much more imaginative and frightening than their popular subgenre counterpart DEAD SNOW, the OUTPOST films have been somewhat underrated by horror fans. By keeping something of a straight face in their depiction of undead Nazis, they mostly eschew the camp factor often associated with the concept, and perhaps are disregarded as a result. However, certain hardcore followers have stood by the series for its legitimate style and storytelling merits, and the newest addition to the franchise, OUTPOST: RISE OF THE SPETSNAZ, retains those merits as it further explores the mythology behind the films.

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    “THE RAID 2″ (Sundance Movie Review)

    It’s unlikely there exists a 2014 movie with more spectacular bloodshed than THE RAID 2. Of course, that statement is a nightmare to those of a queasy nature, or with little constitution for ultraviolence. But anyone fearful THE RAID itself could not be topped, or that its sequel ballooning to a 147-minute runtime would do it a disservice, should begin to feel something in their shoulders. Not hype per se, but more like the thrilling anticipation that permeates the entire movie, as if gearing up to do something truly heart-pounding. As if the movie itself is an opponent. As if you’re waiting for its first punch. You’ll never see it coming, nor the second, or third, or the hammer, or the bat. THE RAID 2 forces its viewer to feel it all, leaving us bruised, exhausted and elated.

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