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    Mario Bava’s “RABID DOGS” (Arrow Blu-ray Review)

    Long considered a master of Italian genre cinema, it’s hard to look back now and see how Mario Bava was received at the time. His movies made money, but both in Italy and abroad Bava was deemed a trashy hack. Now of course, we hail him  one of the most influential Italian directors of all time, but in the mid 70s, he couldn’t even get one of his finest achievements released. 

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    “V/H/S VIRAL” (Movie Review)

    Any debate scheduled to conclude with fisticuffs in a boxing ring is bound to engender a bit more tension than the average Oxford Union fare, but when Alamo Drafthouse CEO Tim League and horror director Ti West clashed at Fantastic Fest this past September over the unsubtle-yet-hilarious/apropos proposition “The Found Footage Genre is a Cancer Eating Away the Integrity of Cinema” the point-counterpoint—as foreshadowed by the pair’s brutal pre-confrontation challenge videos—took on a particularly vitriolic, take-no-prisoners vibe. 

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    Exclusive: “THE FOREST OF FEAR” Speaks!

    Earlier this season, FANGORIA recapped one of New York’s premiere haunts, The Forest of Fear. Located in Tuxedo, NY, at the famed Sterling Forest, this interactive haunt is one of this writer’s personal favorites, combining a real passion for horror with a homegrown humility that makes the experience feel as communal as it is creepy. In gearing up for their last weekend of the season, FANGORIA spoke to the people behind The Forest of Fear, including haunt actors Tom Zorn, Cat RoPo, Armond Cecere as well as the haunt director, Christopher DeTroy (pictured above).

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    “WHY HORROR?” (Toronto After Dark Review)

    Full disclosure: this writer is actually in — albeit briefly —Toronto journo and ardent horror fan Tal Zimerman’s new globe-trotting doc WHY HORROR? which might muddy my critical perception. Or not. The film, which is having its Canadian premiere at the Toronto After Dark Film Festival tonight (reportedly a sold out show, but you can try your last minute luck by storming the Scotiabank Theatre gates), sports a who’s who of terror’s most celebrated talking heads, from John Carpenter to George A. Romero to Alexandre Aja to Steve Niles, all collected in an on-camera investigation into why people watch horror films. 

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    “WYRMWOOD” (Toronto After Dark Review)

    Despite a bleak, bleak, bleak opening sequence—the line “This morning I shot my wife and child with a nail gun” is spoken less than five minutes into the film and we are not spared the gory flashback details—in fairly short order the Australian zombie adventure WYRMWOOD takes a sharp left into deliciously wild, ridiculously hepped-up pastures, exuding a sinister buoyancy and spirit that resembles less a sui generis stand alone film than, say, the second or third entry in a franchise wherein filmmakers striving for freshness are willing (forced?) to indulge the more absurdist, outlandish elements of the horror palette—think BEYOND THUNDERDOME meets DREAM WARRIORS meets DEAD BY DAWN not MAD MAX meets NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET meets EVIL DEAD. 

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