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    “KNOCK KNOCK” (Film Review)

    While Eli Roth may be known for his particular and popular brand of horror, ranging from his directorial work on HOSTEL to his acting in AFTERSHOCK to his producing work on the big screen and small, one might forget that Roth cut his teeth in one of horror’s most longstanding institutions: Troma. And while Roth’s horror geek cred has never come into question, what with his penchant for provocative, Eurohorror-influenced content, Roth’s sensibilities have long existed within the realm of exploitation. But with KNOCK KNOCK, Roth’s most recent directorial effort, horror audiences will see a new side to Roth as a filmmaker as those sensibilities collide into something completely different: a midnight movie made for the mainstream horror fan.

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    “THE UNWANTED” (DVD Review)

    Writer/director Bret Wood’s moody microbudget melodrama THE UNWANTED (out now on Blu-ray from Kino-Lorber) has been met with general critical indifference since its release. Too glacial in its pacing, too light on hard sex and violence for many horror movie hounds and too modestly financed to thrill those looking for a glossy arthouse piece, THE UNWANTED is certainly an anomaly and doesn’t fit comfortably anywhere, really. That, of course, is part of its fascination; it’s a film that goes against convention and has a strange power that is hard to shake.

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    “COP CAR” (Fantasia Movie Review)

    COP CAR, in which two preteen boys steal a cruiser from a sheriff who’s very, very anxious to get it back, is not the kind of movie you’d get from a studio taking on this premise (shenanigans ensue!), nor is it a ruthless, transgressive indie nightmare (THE HITCHER with kids!). Rather, it derives its tension from the matter-of-fact way it plays out the story’s inevitable developments.

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    “SCOOBY DOO! AND KISS: ROCK AND ROLL MYSTERY” (Film Review)

    Ardent fans of Hanna-Barbera’s ludicrous and legendary 1978 TV movie KISS MEETS THE PHANTOM OF THE PARK (of which this writer is one) love it unconditionally; the film (directed by recently deceased genre filmmaker Gordon Hessler), is absolutely one of the strangest, inadvertently hilarious and patently ridiculous cult films of all time and there’s truly nothing else quite like it, anywhere, anytime, anyplace. But for the band, PHANTOM is of significant historical relevance. By the time the film began production, KISS was at their commercial peak and, with of co-founder and self-confessed pop culture junkie Gene Simmons’ enthusiastic blessing, had found its garish painted visages stamped across every sort of mass-marketed merchandise known to man. And, after the success of STAR WARS the previous year and the pomp of their literally blood soaked Marvel Comics appearance, it made sense to push the KISS phenomenon into the realm of cinema.

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    “DEATHGASM” (Fantasia Movie Review)

    The metalhead helped make the horror genre strong. That Manpower LP cover with devil ladies and lightning, a parental nightmare during the Satanic Panic hysteria, and the power harnessed by rolling the die as a Chaotic Neutral Dwarf that would annihilate your enemies: This spirit existed in horror cinema’s heyday, meaning the ’80s. The real stuff. Denim warriors. Studs.

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    “SCREAM: THE TV SERIES: Season 1, Episode 3″ (TV Review)

    Although my prediction about the format was correct, SCREAM has finally been elevated in episode three, “Wanna Play a Game?”. The opening kill brings us back to a murder from the past, a scene from the notorious mid-’90s Brandon James murders. And to get catch up for tonight’s episode, this is who we’ve got in our SCREAM: THE TV SERIES clique of victims and suspects:

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