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    “KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM” (Movie Review)

    Reviewing KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM puts one in a situation that has become depressingly familiar: Having to address the movie that’s there instead of the movie it once was, could and should have been. The much-discussed postproduction woes are abundantly evident in the final product, though the silver lining is that, for horror fans anyway, KNIGHTS gets a little better as it goes along.

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    “WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Is it the cyclical nature of things that’s responsible for one of our most overexposed monsters to return in two revelatory films at 2014’s Sundance? Jim Jarmusch’s ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE finds almost everything vampires have embodied in cinema in a lyrical, self-aware hangout led by two of our most poetic and appropriately vampiric actors, Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton. Meanwhile, Taika Waititi and Jermaine Clement’s brilliantly comedic WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS also encompasses most everything considered a vampire archetype, but in what’s easily one of the funniest horror-comedies in ages. Where plenty of morose vampires have contemplated their endless existence, these four bloodsucking flatmates in New Zealand attempt to keep up with it all, and give the viewer a gory, goofy time doing so.

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    “THE VOICES” (Sundance Movie Review)

    What’s the worst thing you’ve ever laughed at? It’s doubtful that THE VOICES tops it sure, but Marjane Satrapi’s film is playing with a similar sentiment in its pop-color focus on a mentally imbalanced man (Ryan Reynolds) spurred to kill by his talking cat. Awash with pink factory machinery, bright yellow windbreakers, chatty severed heads and cheery disposition utterly twisting the grim, gruesome content out of whack, THE VOICES is surely not for everyone. Those with a predilection for a little prodding outside their comfort zone and a willingness to chuckle at some terrible things will likely find it a tasteless, special little exercise.

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    “OUTPOST: RISE OF THE SPETSNAZ” (Movie Review)

    Despite being much more imaginative and frightening than their popular subgenre counterpart DEAD SNOW, the OUTPOST films have been somewhat underrated by horror fans. By keeping something of a straight face in their depiction of undead Nazis, they mostly eschew the camp factor often associated with the concept, and perhaps are disregarded as a result. However, certain hardcore followers have stood by the series for its legitimate style and storytelling merits, and the newest addition to the franchise, OUTPOST: RISE OF THE SPETSNAZ, retains those merits as it further explores the mythology behind the films.

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    Haunted Mirror and Eeerie Imagery Tease “OCULUS”

    Thanks to a fantastic response from last year’s TIFF, and of course the unsettling ABSENTIA, Mike Flanagan’s OCULUS is one of the most eagerly anticipated horror films of the year. Hitting this April, the tease has begun, and our first glimpse bears a storybook resemblance, introducing the viewer to the legend of this accursed artifact that haunts the film.

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    Q&A: Writer/Actor Kevin Grevioux on “I, FRANKENSTEIN”—The Monster’s Legacy, Lost Creatures and More

    The new “monster” in I, FRANKENSTEIN is being billed as a modern spin on the character, but he actually harks back directly to Mary Shelley’s original novel. This return to a more self-aware, articulate creature was conceived by writer Kevin Grevioux, who spoke to Fango about his own creation process, what got changed on the way to the screen and the challenges of Hollywood scriptwriting.

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    “THE RAID 2″ (Sundance Movie Review)

    It’s unlikely there exists a 2014 movie with more spectacular bloodshed than THE RAID 2. Of course, that statement is a nightmare to those of a queasy nature, or with little constitution for ultraviolence. But anyone fearful THE RAID itself could not be topped, or that its sequel ballooning to a 147-minute runtime would do it a disservice, should begin to feel something in their shoulders. Not hype per se, but more like the thrilling anticipation that permeates the entire movie, as if gearing up to do something truly heart-pounding. As if the movie itself is an opponent. As if you’re waiting for its first punch. You’ll never see it coming, nor the second, or third, or the hammer, or the bat. THE RAID 2 forces its viewer to feel it all, leaving us bruised, exhausted and elated.

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