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    “CURSE OF CHUCKY” (Blu-ray/DVD Review)

    When CURSE OF CHUCKY had its world premiere at Montreal’s Fantasia festival this past summer, it passed a crucial test for a disc-bound feature: It felt right at home on the big screen. The movie was shrewdly tailored for its lower budget by writer/director Don Mancini, who also reverts the central Good Guy back to scary bad guy status.

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    “COLONY”: It’s Roanoke… in Space!

    I was but a child when Stephen King’s STORM OF THE CENTURY miniseries aired. It’s namedropping of Roanoke sparked maybe not a deep interest, but certainly the hope that someday someone would craft a thrilling tale around “The Lost Colony.” Will that thrilling adventure be in space?

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    “AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN, Bitchcraft” (TV Review)

    Whatever batshittery the rest of COVEN entails (and the door is left wide open for such), that which is contained in its premiere episode “Bitchcraft”—along with an already stellar ensemble, plus the work of breakout director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon—makes for one of the best, and maybe most definitive, hours AMERICAN HORROR STORY has ever seen.

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    Fango Flashback: “THE BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW” (1970)

    We are perhaps inherently sympathetic to witches on film. They are, after all, creatures and characters of folklore and horror with the most significant and legitimate real-life counterparts. Those counterparts, aside from putting their faith in something seemingly older and wiser than most all, have been the unjustified targets of horrifying religious and gender-based persecution throughout history—most notoriously in the 17th Century. This weighs on the viewer, informing even films and tales in which witches are practicing magick in the name of some larger darkness, most especially in the type of Tigon British Film Productions pictures dubbed “Folk Horror” where more often than not, those charged with stopping pagan deeds are real bastards. For example: the harrowing, cruel Matthew Hopkins in perhaps the best “Folk Horror” film, WITCHFINDER GENERAL, or even the intensely stuffy Sergeant Howie in Robin Hardy’s classic THE WICKER MAN.

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    One Sheet, Theatrical Dates for Drafthouse Films’ re-release of ’79 oddity, “THE VISITOR”

    On the heels of the reveal Drafthouse Films will be doing remastered justice to Abel Ferrara’s New York revenge classic MS. 45, comes the announcement another of their highly anticipated repertory releases will hit select theaters this Halloween: Michael J. Pardise’s massively insane cosmic Christ film THE VISITOR, starring directors John Huston and Sam Peckinpah, Shelley Winters and Lance Henriksen.

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    Hammer to adapt Witchy novella, “THE DAYLIGHT GATE”

    Excitingly, witches are back in a big way. Is the short-lived sub-genre of Folk Horror, as well? It would seem so. In just over a week, FANGORIA is sponsoring Beyond Fest’s British Invasion double feature of occult-minded THE BORDERLANDS and Ben Wheatley’s psychedelic pagan period piece A FIELD IN ENGLAND. Both, set in rural England, follow in the influential footsteps of the likes of WITCHFINDER GENERAL, BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW and CRY OF THE BANSHEE. Now, Hammer Films (who tread that ground with the likes of the great THE DEVIL RIDES OUT and THE WITCHES) has taken an interest in Jeanette Winterson’s 17th-century set THE DAYLIGHT GATE.

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