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    Exclusive “WE ARE WHAT WE ARE” Clip talks Spectacular Finale

    If you’ve seen Jim Mickle’s stellar refashioning, WE ARE WHAT WE ARE, you know it’s a beautiful, melancholy American Gothic horror story that builds to something of an operatic finale. Now available on VOD and coming to Blu-ray and DVD this month, FANGORIA presents an exclusive look at an accompanying special feature, in which actors Bill Sage and Julia Garner talk the bloody set-piece and dive into both the reality of shooting it and their characters’ mindsets.

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    “RITUAL” (Movie Review)

    A heavy sense of dread is cast over films in which terrible things befall characters that inhabit a sunny, 50s-esque world. It’s not an unfamiliar tactic, coating events in a false, nostalgic cheer that, by contrast, emphasizes the evil that men do (and have always done) even more. Or, maybe it just hurts to see violence toward someone introduced in such an adorable bathing suit. Whatever the case, writer/director Mickey Keating opens RITUAL on such an aesthetic—but not before a Gaspar Noé homage/onscreen warning of the violence to come—in which the film’s leads romantically meet on the beach. It’s an ideal moment, a single push in as the two flirt, that’s sandwiched between that explicit cautioning and their dialogue drowned out by foreboding noise. This being a horror film, we know that perfect moment cannot last, and here it is dissolving before us. Only the image remains, like a memory. Which, ultimately it is; Lovely (Lisa Marie Summerscales) and Tom’s (Dean Cates) courtship doesn’t even make it through the opening credits.

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    From the FANGORIA Vault: David Lynch’s “BLUE VELVET”

    Welcome again, fans of Fango! Just as we ready ourselves to ring in the New Year, we decided to dig up something extra special for you all out of our archive. Luckily, we uncovered some extremely rare stills from the production of David Lynch’s mad opus, BLUE VELVET, as well as a letter to Fangoria’s Editor Emeritus, Tony Timpone!

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    Q&A: Ortiz, Ramirez & Valderrama on their time in the “SANITARIUM”

    The anthology film has become somewhat of a boon for up-and-coming horror filmmakers, acting as a way to present short format work as an affordable calling card without the limitation of exposure that hinders short films. Anthologies also give these filmmakers, many of whom are rooted in the independent scene, creative freedom that they normally wouldn’t get in a longer form project with higher budgets and more production scrutiny. Furthermore, the pressure of putting together a feature film is often spread over more than one filmmaker, which in and of itself can allow the director to focus on the necessary aspects of storytelling.

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