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    Guest Blog: “THE ABCs OF DEATH 2″ Director Alejandro Brugues on “ALIEN”

    As a burgeoning series of films, THE ABCs OF DEATH anthologies are predicated on, well death. The wait for it. The horror of it. The humor in it. It’s inevitable, and even in just three or so minutes, the build can be massive. These experimental, sometimes exhausting omnibuses see a massive ensemble of international filmmakers try their hands at the short format and visceral release of onscreen demise. But what put them on this path? What shocking, horrifying, hilarious, titillating filmic expirations influenced them? The directors of THE ABCs OF DEATH 2 are contributing guest blogs on their favorite cinematic deaths to all manner of movie sites. Here at Fango, JUAN OF THE DEAD helmer Alejandro Brugués writes of his.

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    Q&A: Sean Hogan, on the Long-Awaited U.S. Bow of “THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS”

    In 2011, an intimate, brisk, affecting film unspooled at festivals around the world and introduced many audiences to UK talent Sean Hogan. The director of LIE STILL (unfortunately retitled to THE HAUNTING OF 24 in the U.S.), who had also just contributed to transgressive anthology LITTLE DEATHS, seemed poised to break through in a heavier manner. After all, his THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS was a literary, thoughtful piece of horror, one looking to enthrall and ultimately repulse, ending on a particularly eerie note. 

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    Q&A: Actors Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams on Surviving “THE PURGE: ANARCHY”

    Writer/director James DeMonaco’s sequel THE PURGE: ANARCHY (just out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal) expands the scope of the housebound original to explore how the violent annual ritual affects a wider range of people. Two of the key participants are played by Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams, who sat down with FANGORIA to discuss their characters.

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    Q&A: The Vicious Brothers talk “EXTRATERRESTRIAL”

    There are few horror debuts that have been as divisive as GRAVE ENCOUNTERS, the found footage haunter from Tribeca favorites The Vicious Brothers, the alias of filmmaking duo Stuart Ortiz and Colin Minihan. While that film has gone on to various degrees of cult acclaim and notoriety, The Vicious Brothers amped the scale considerably for their follow-up, the alien abduction film EXTRATERRESTRIAL. With a bigger cast and bigger budget, the Minihan-directed film written by the duo also serves as their first traditionally shot narrative, although still within their mischievous and creepy cinematic voice. FANGORIA caught up with Ortiz and Minihan recently to talk EXTRATERRESTRIAL, moving on from found footage and what subgenre they may tackle next…

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    “WHY HORROR?” (Toronto After Dark Review)

    Full disclosure: this writer is actually in — albeit briefly —Toronto journo and ardent horror fan Tal Zimerman’s new globe-trotting doc WHY HORROR? which might muddy my critical perception. Or not. The film, which is having its Canadian premiere at the Toronto After Dark Film Festival tonight (reportedly a sold out show, but you can try your last minute luck by storming the Scotiabank Theatre gates), sports a who’s who of terror’s most celebrated talking heads, from John Carpenter to George A. Romero to Alexandre Aja to Steve Niles, all collected in an on-camera investigation into why people watch horror films. 

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    30 for 31: “MESSIAH OF EVIL”

    A lot of strange films came out of those old hippie days. Though film was once considered the medium of old white dudes, the 1960s opening of countless film schools made it accessible to the younger generation. Young filmmakers of the late ’60s and early ’70s were treading into a new field, and ss an artistic expression this new generation created films based on experimentation, surrealism, and sometimes hippie-cult panic. These sentiments were echoed in the horror realm in flicks like LET’S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH, I DRINK YOUR BLOOD, and, my favorite of the lot, MESSIAH OF EVIL.

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    “WYRMWOOD” (Toronto After Dark Review)

    Despite a bleak, bleak, bleak opening sequence—the line “This morning I shot my wife and child with a nail gun” is spoken less than five minutes into the film and we are not spared the gory flashback details—in fairly short order the Australian zombie adventure WYRMWOOD takes a sharp left into deliciously wild, ridiculously hepped-up pastures, exuding a sinister buoyancy and spirit that resembles less a sui generis stand alone film than, say, the second or third entry in a franchise wherein filmmakers striving for freshness are willing (forced?) to indulge the more absurdist, outlandish elements of the horror palette—think BEYOND THUNDERDOME meets DREAM WARRIORS meets DEAD BY DAWN not MAD MAX meets NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET meets EVIL DEAD. 

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    Festival Report: One Night “AFTER DARK”

    As you may or may not be aware, every year the city of Toronto hosts an annual International film festival. It’s a gargantuan undertaking that envelops the city’s downtown each September; the streets teem like anthills with filmgoers, volunteers, scenesters, advertisers, paparazzi, autograph hunters, and the average citizenry standing and gawping at whatever celestial deities have descended from the firmament that week. 

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