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  • Stephen King’s “CELL” joins “31” at Saban Films

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    Over the past year, the distribution game has changed rather radically in the independent film world. While studios devote more and more resources to blockbusters and tentpole films, smaller distributors with more radical release strategies have found solid footing by betting on the strength of their output. Entities such as STX and A24 have established their reputation with releases such as THE WITCH, THE GIFT and GREEN ROOM, and now, Saban Films looks to join them with a growing genre slate that includes Rob Zombie’s 31 and now, as per The Hollywood Reporter, Tod William’s adaptation of Stephen King’s CELL.

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  • “THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS” (Film Review)

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    As much sense as it may make to a marketing executive or producer, having the name of a horror icon attached to your film is actually somewhat of a risky proposition. By associating a film with someone who is known and beloved by genre films, expectations will understandably be raised, which could work as a double-edged sword if those standards are not met. And in the case of Nick Simon’s THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS, having that attachment be the final credit in the prolific career of Wes Craven (who served as executive producer) is an even larger shadow to shine through in the eyes of horror enthusiasts.

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  • On Set: Mickey Keating’s Psychological Creepfest “DARLING”

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    Walking toward the Harlem townhouse serving as the key location of DARLING, your faithful Fango correspondent spots a couple of cops hanging around the front steps. It seems odd that such a small independent shoot would need this kind of security—and then it turns out that the uniformed lawmen are actually executive producer Larry Fessenden and his regular actor John Speredakos, making cameos in the movie.

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  • Stream to Scream: “HE NEVER DIED”

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    There’s something effortlessly refreshing about films that confidently reside in their own universe. By offering characters with established history, rapport, and relationships, watching their stories unfold has an immersive quality that more grounded, gritty fare just cannot capture. Therefore, when something like HE NEVER DIED comes around and offers up a supernatural horror comedy that lives somewhere between JOHN WICK and TWIN PEAKS, it’s all the more of a twisted treat than your standard terror titles.

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  • The Dreadful Ten: Top 10 Most Anticipated Events at Texas Frightmare Weekend 2016!

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    In the years since the FANGORIA Weekend of Horrors has laid dormant, the world of fan conventions has evolved into an entirely different beast. Yet among the Comic-Cons and Walker-Stalker’s of the world, few horror conventions have earned the esteemed reputation of Texas Frightmare Weekend, now in their 11th year as the Southwest’s Premiere Horror Convention. And with the 2016 edition less than a month away, FANGORIA has put together our list of the top 10 most anticipated events of Texas Frightmare Weekend!

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  • “MY BEST FRIEND’S EXORCISM” (Book Review)

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    Though we are steeped deep in gloriously gonzo unorthodoxy for more than 100 pages before the musclebound 20something self-described practitioner of “puke and rebuke” de-demonization turns up in Grady Hendrix’s MY BEST FRIEND’S EXORCISM, it is nonetheless hilarious just how absurdly far from the Father Merrin tree the character falls.

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  • Exclusive Q&A: Director Nick Simon talks Craven, Killers & “THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS”

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    Last year, the horror world lost one of its most beloved icons: filmmaker Wes Craven, the man behind such chilling classics as THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, SCREAM and more. Not only was Craven a fantastic artist in his own right, but he was an incredibly generous man in the world of horror, helping as producer to shepherd the directorial careers of Robert Kurtzman, Patrick Lussier, and John Gulager. And before his untimely passing, Craven helped to bring one final cinematic vision to the screen, ushering up-and-coming filmmaker Nick Simon for THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS.

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  • FANGO Flashback: “LAKE MUNGO”

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    While much can be said about the stylistic and tonal differences between faux-doc horror and found footage, the most prominent difference between the subgenres is the illusion of transparency. As any genre fan can tell you, found footage does its damnedest to downplay transparency, playing everything mostly straight-faced and therefore crafting many of the tired, repetitive trademarks of those films. However, faux-doc horror works so well because it appears to be on-the-level with the audience, offering multiple perspectives, editing, music and an atmosphere of truth that informs the execution.

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