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    FANGORIA Presents: “SIN REAPER,” Big Creeper

    One of the most important aspects about the current releases under the FANGORIA Presents banner (see here for details; to find Fango’s Comcast collection on your VOD channel, search this way: Movies > Movie Collections > Fangoria) is the variety of all the films chosen. Whether it’s a bloody family outing in AXED, eeriness in Eastern Europe in ENTITY or pandemic pandemonium in GERM Z, FANGORIA Presents aims to give fright fans a different experience in terror with each selection. However, Fango has something special for gorehounds with Sebastian Bartolitius’s SIN REAPER, in which nightmares of a dark monastery and an enigmatic killer come to life for Samantha, a young woman with a mysterious past.

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    Canuck indie vet Larry Kent Goes All-Out Horror with “SHE WHO MUST BURN”

    “SHE WHO MUST BURN.” Hard to ignore that title, especially when pasted over a distressing close-up of a woman’s torched, screaming face that wouldn’t be out of place as a screen grab from Joseph Ellison’s DON’T GO IN THE HOUSE. Not the first thing one expects from idiosyncratic auteur Larry Kent, who was the ground zero of independent cinema in Canada 50 years ago with such classics of counter-cultural abandon and generational disenchantment as THE BITTER ASH (1963) and HIGH (1969), and best known recently for 2005’s festival favorite of family dysfunction, THE HAMSTER CAGE. And yet Kent, now well into his 70s, is, against all expectations, hard at work in Vancouver on his first ever lunge into the horror genre with SHE WHO MUST BURN, described as a “political, feminist, ultra-violent horror movie” that brazenly takes shots at the Christian Right’s pro-life lobby.

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    “BIG BAD WOLVES” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Two years ago, Israeli writer/directors Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado provided an out-of-nowhere highlight of the Tribeca Film Festival with RABIES, their multiple-twisty variation on killer-in-the-woods standards. Now they’re back at the fest with the world premiere of BIG BAD WOLVES, which isn’t quite as narratively knotty but proves the duo equally adept at a more brute-forceful brand of thriller.

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    “THE MACHINE” (Tribeca Movie Review)

    Some films just look cool. Caradog James’ future-set cold war tale THE MACHINE is massively so. From an aesthetic standpoint it is slickly designed and beautiful on what’s surely a modest budget. Temperature-wise, it exists in a seeming eternally harsh space of overcast skies, nighttime and enormous, often barely-holding up warehouses and labs. Star Caity Lotz is fluid and incredible in her movement. But what’s truly coolest is the ensuing warm, radical spirit that reveals itself throughout it all.

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    “FRIGHT BYTES” looks at the Rondos, Roger Ebert and Horror Trivia!

    First of all, FRIGHT BYTES would like to thank all of our fans and subscribers for helping us win the Rondo Hatton Award for Best Horror Multimedia this year!  We, your hosts Lianne Spiderbaby and Steve Mac are incredibly humbled and excited about the award and we know that it wouldn’t be possible without you. So, thank you!

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    Long Live the New Flesh: Tape Heads, Romancing VHS with Vultra Video

    It’s Friday night, 1988 and you are at the video store with your family. You browse the aisles and you can’t help but be drawn to the lurid images on the VHS box covers in the section your parents won’t let you rent from. As they wander the New Releases, you pretend to be going to the Family section but when the coast is clear, you cut into a dash to Horror. Blood. Skulls. Mutated toxic maniacs. Chainsaw-wielding psychopaths. Monsters and mayhem. You thrill to the covers and wonder what exactly is lurking in these strange films – films so shocking your parents would probably throw a fit if they saw you looking at them, which only makes the experience more thrilling. Since you can’t see the movies, you spend the whole car ride home making them up in your imagination.

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