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    NY! Tomorrow night, see “KISS OF THE DAMNED” w/ director Q&A for free

    You’ll want to see Xan Cassavetes’ sultry, bloody and Euro-reminiscent vampire feature on the big screen and if you’re in NYC, we can certainly accommodate. Tomorrow night, the film screens with Cassavetes in attendance and Magnolia Pictures and Fango have tickets for five readers and their guests!

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    Win a “MANBORG” Prize Pack!

    Have you seen the madness of MANBORG? Half man, half cyber robot thingy all wrapped up in one bat-shirt crazy looking movie. Dark Sky and FANGORIA are giving away two sweet packs which include the MANBORG DVD, a poster and a limited edition MANBORG t-shirt. Want to win this apocalyptic prize? Keep reading.

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    FANGORIA Presents: “SIN REAPER,” Big Creeper

    One of the most important aspects about the current releases under the FANGORIA Presents banner (see here for details; to find Fango’s Comcast collection on your VOD channel, search this way: Movies > Movie Collections > Fangoria) is the variety of all the films chosen. Whether it’s a bloody family outing in AXED, eeriness in Eastern Europe in ENTITY or pandemic pandemonium in GERM Z, FANGORIA Presents aims to give fright fans a different experience in terror with each selection. However, Fango has something special for gorehounds with Sebastian Bartolitius’s SIN REAPER, in which nightmares of a dark monastery and an enigmatic killer come to life for Samantha, a young woman with a mysterious past.

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    Canuck indie vet Larry Kent Goes All-Out Horror with “SHE WHO MUST BURN”

    “SHE WHO MUST BURN.” Hard to ignore that title, especially when pasted over a distressing close-up of a woman’s torched, screaming face that wouldn’t be out of place as a screen grab from Joseph Ellison’s DON’T GO IN THE HOUSE. Not the first thing one expects from idiosyncratic auteur Larry Kent, who was the ground zero of independent cinema in Canada 50 years ago with such classics of counter-cultural abandon and generational disenchantment as THE BITTER ASH (1963) and HIGH (1969), and best known recently for 2005’s festival favorite of family dysfunction, THE HAMSTER CAGE. And yet Kent, now well into his 70s, is, against all expectations, hard at work in Vancouver on his first ever lunge into the horror genre with SHE WHO MUST BURN, described as a “political, feminist, ultra-violent horror movie” that brazenly takes shots at the Christian Right’s pro-life lobby.

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