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    Q+A: Director Katie Aselton talks indie thriller “BLACK ROCK”

    FANGO recently chatted with independent filmmaker Katie Aselton about her latest feature, BLACK ROCK (which hits theatres this Friday May 17) – a horror thriller about three lifelong friends who get much more than they bargained for after they set out on a camping trip with the intention of reconnecting with their childhoods. Aselton also acts in the film, alongside Lake Bell and Kate Bosworth. The screenplay was written by Aselton’s husband Mark Duplass, a film director, actor and producer often cited as one of leading visionaries of the mumblecore movement – a subgenre of independent film primarily characterized by its highly naturalistic approach. Aselton gave us the details on her filmmaking experience in addition to her take on mumblecore, and her relationships with both acting and directing. (Read more on the film in our current print issue FANGORIA #323.)

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    “THE GHOSTKEEPERS” (Movie Review)

    Last year, writer-director Anthony D.P. Mann released TERROR OF DRACULA, a painstakingly respectful enactment of Bram Stoker’s often-bowdlerized and bastardized 1897 novel. TERROR perfectly captured the restrained pacing and hazy photography of a BBC production from decades past, and the result felt like something that might have aired stateside on public television around Halloween—a powerful fount of nostalgia for some, this reviewer included. With follow-up THE GHOSTKEEPERS set for release this year, Mann’s challenge was to try and carve out a similar impression, only now with his own original material and in a modern setting.

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    George A. Romero’s “KNIGHTRIDERS” (Blu-ray Review, Arrow Films)

    The man who gave the world the modern flesh-munching zombie will always be remembered as a horror maestro, but one of George Romero’s finest efforts from his underground Pittsburgh days was made with no intention of giving audiences the willies (well, except for the sight of Tom Savini in a speedo). KNIGHTRIDERS comes between DAWN OF THE DEAD and CREEPSHOW in the director’s career and features roles for many of his stock company of the time like Savini, Ken Foree, and John Amplas (MARTIN). It’s an odd story involving Renaissance fair knights who joust on motorcycles, and yet it just might be Romero’s most personal movie of the period. Midst the weird world of contemporary King Arthur honor comes a story about artistic integrity amongst a group of outsider artists. It’s a pretty blatant exploration of Romero’s fears of abandoning his merry band of low budget horror movie mirth-makers for Hollywood and signaled the beginning of the end of his early career. KNIGHTRIDERS is an essential slice of Romero magic from his golden period and now that the good folks at Arrow have gone and released it in one of their marquee Blu-ray sets, there’s never been a better time to catch up with this sadly forgotten cult classic.

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    FX veterans Studio ADI Kickstart all-practical creature feature, “HARBINGER DOWN”

    Do you mourn the scarcity of practical FX? Do you clamor for prosthetics, stop motion and miniatures? Here’s your chance to help. Tom Woodruff, Jr and Alec Gillis of Studio ADI, some of the wizards behind beloved creatures in ALIENS, PREDATOR and TREMORS are hard at work crafting something new, something horrifying, something tangible.

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    Q&A: Luke Evans makes sure “NO ONE LIVES”

    The brand new bloodbath from stylistic director Ryûhei Kitamura (VERSUS, GODZILLA: FINAL WARS, THE MIDNIGHT MEAT TRAIN) is a welcome twist on the slasher. As most would argue you’re identifying with the stalker of these films anyway, NO ONE LIVES (out May 10 in select cities from Anchor Bay) presents its sociopath, the quietly menacing Driver, as your protagonist. It’s his world, the rest of the ensemble is just dying in it. Fango spoke with the film’s psycho killer, Luke Evans, about the movie, the inner workings of his character and all of the nasty fun he seemed to have on set.

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