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    Driver’s Ed Shock Horror Top 5 by ‘BLOOD ON THE WINDSCREEN’ author John Harrison!

    John Harrison, author of BLOOD ON THE WINDSCREEN (which we reviewed in FANGORIA #323 ) selects his five personal favorite drivers’ ed scare films! Ironically, while these films were originally showed to kids as young as 12 , times have changed, and so we’ve age-gated them here! Warning: some of these films are very graphic, containing an overload of real accident footage, and should be watched with extreme caution.

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    Watch Studio ADI bring creatures to life in “HARBINGER DOWN” BTS videos

    Director Alec Gillis and producer Tom Woodruff, Jr, two gentleman behind the acclaimed Studio ADI and subsequently some of the best practical and makeup FX work (and no strangers to the pages of Fango) are hard at work on HARBINGER DOWN. Raising finishing funds via Kickstarter, the film is  meant to focus almost exclusively on physical in-camera creature FX and a series of on-set videos have revealed there’s no shortage of wizardry taking place.

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    “V/H/S/2″ (Movie Review)

    [This review was initially published in January 2013, it is reposted below in light of the film's VOD release.] Where V/H/S was a raw, lo-fi and frightening odyssey via POV, its sequel is—and from the very outset—bigger, weirder and even reflective of its predecessor. In the first few minutes alone, V/H/S/2 runs through almost every format previously explored, from spy camera to camcorder to iChat; and almost every perspective as well, from investigative to voyeuristic (often both at the same time) to daily doings. And while less traditionally dreadful, where it all leads is infinitely more thrilling.

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    FANGORIA Presents: “SIN REAPER” actress says her prayers

    Any fright fan, no matter how casual, would be hard pressed in saying that slasher films are easy experiences for actresses. Stories of startling on-camera reveals and unexpected FX trickery to achieve the proper depiction of fear only add more to the weight already carried by these overtly physical, and sometimes thankless, roles.

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