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    “BORGMAN” (TIFF Movie Review)

    Dutch filmmaker Alex Van Warmerdam’s modern-day mythical black comedy BORGMAN was scooped up amidst much Cannes buzz by Drafthouse films earlier this year and just made its North American debut at TIFF, where Fango caught it yesterday. A strange and feisty film whose horror affiliations are more existential than overt, BORGMAN is about a handful of divine shit-disturbers, led by the title character, who turn the life of a suburban couple upside down.

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    [TIFF '13] Q&A: Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani Preview Giallo, “THE STRANGE COLOUR OF YOUR BODY’S TEARS”

    Crafting a form of experimental neo-gialli that seems even less interested in narrative logic than the 70s style it’s recalling, filmmakers Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani have been long overdue for a new work in their brand of stirring, sensual, psychedelic cinema. Following the lasting impression of 2009’s AMER, and sheer teasing of THE ABCs OF DEATH entry, “O for Orgasm,” they’ve set upon the Toronto International Film Festival this year with an all-time giallo title and a film—as the teaser so visualizes—sure to blow minds. FANGORIA spoke with the pair for a preview of what to expect from THE STRANGE COLOUR OF YOUR BODY’S TEARS.

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    “ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE” (TIFF Movie Review)

    The first thing you must know about the film ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE is that it is a vampire film. The second thing you need to know is that it is written and directed by arthouse auteur Jim Jarmusch. Therefore you can fairly easily and accurately assume that it is a vampire film like no other and your embrace of its charms will depend squarely on this revelation.

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    Programmer Dennis Bartok talks LA’s World 3-D Film Expo

    Historically speaking, horror films and the third dimension have complemented each other akin to the way popcorn has complemented the theatrical experience. During the golden age of horror, 3D was used to scare audiences young and old by bringing their fears off the screen, eliciting a reaction that incorporates beyond strictly the sense of sight, thanks to the magic of optical illusion.

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    “THE DEAD 2: INDIA” (Movie Review)

    Low budget horror is oversaturated with zombies, so the greatest trick THE DEAD pulled was standing out not especially for its viscera, but for its location. Set in vast African expanses, it impressed with its landscapes, its photography and its languid pace. Stretches of it were so silent that it could have worked as a completely dialogue-free film like Luc Besson’s LE DERNIER COMBAT, and the fact that it paired an American soldier (Rob Freeman) with an indigenous African sergeant (Prince David Osei) gave it at least a suggestion of subtext.

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