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    “24 EXPOSURES” (Movie Review)

    After his impressive and darkly comic horror debut with a segment of V/H/S, many horror lovers wondered when mumblecore auteur and occasional genre actor Joe Swanberg would tackle feature-length horror filmmaking. With his bent toward atmospheric, character-driven storytelling and associations with genre filmmakers like Adam Wingard and Ti West, it was only a matter of time before Swanberg found a horror story of his own to tell—yet fans of his V/H/S piece may be surprised that Swanberg opted out of startling, high-concept scares for the slow-burning dread of 24 EXPOSURES.

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    “COOTIES” (Sundance Movie Review)

    COOTIES may very well have one of the great opening title sequences. An exhaustive, repulsive and painfully up close document of the process that makes a chicken a chicken nugget, its nature may also very well prime the viewer for something COOTIES doesn’t seem too interested in being outside of the introduction: subversive and gross. And while the film is at points a very funny one, the ever-present reluctance to deliver on true carnage or amplify the bits of satire peppered throughout also make it a lacking one.

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    Notes on “COLD IN JULY” and “THE GUEST” at Sundance

    While “genre-heavy” in lineup, the 2014 Sundance Film Festival is not particularly confined to horror. In fact, a couple of this year’s most highly anticipated films see two of our brightest “new” horror filmmakers transition from one slice of pulp to another, carrying previous themes and aesthetics over to energizing, high quality thrillers that will be of no less interest to their, and our, fans.  Directors Jim Mickle and Adam Wingard, and their respective partners-in-crime (an apt term, here) Nick Damici and Simon Barrett have crafted two synth-driven, colorful, Carpenter font-using pictures that inadvertently turned into a fantastic double feature in Park City.  

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    “THE BABADOOK” (Sundance Movie Review)

    THE BABADOOK is absolutely fraught from its arresting opening sequence, in which single mother Amelia recalls, in nightmare, the car accident that took her husband Oskar away. The only thing that eventually pulls her from the aggressive dreamscape is an unrelenting shout from her son Samuel, who in turn was pulled out of Amelia on that very tragic day. More than an introduction to the stylish, aurally assaulting and often tremendous feature debut from Jennifer Kent, THE BABADOOK’s beginning serves to reveal that Oskar’s demise is still very much at the forefront of Amelia’s mind, with Samuel’s distant cries for help not a close second. Her son’s very existence comes with baggage, and as soon as the audience is hip to such, we’re primed for Kent’s exploring of how to reconcile the natural sentiment of sometimes just not liking your kid.

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    Q&A: Allison Miller on Her Satanic Pregnancy in “DEVIL’S DUE”

    There’s nothing on Earth like a mother’s love—even if her baby is literally the spawn of Satan. Playing expectant mom Sam in DEVIL’S DUE is Allison Miller, who last tangled with the supernatural in 2009’s live-action BLOOD: THE LAST VAMPIRE. She’ll likely hit the horror crowd in a bigger way as she delves into her dark side on DEVIL’S DUE, and hopefully leave a lasting impression in this horror-heavy month. Miller spoke to FANGORIA about playing the malevolent mother-to-be, her working relationship with filmmaking team Radio Silence and adapting to the mechanics of found-footage filmmaking.

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    Q&A: The Cast of the Chilling Israeli Shocker “BIG BAD WOLVES”

    The 2014 genre year already has one of its top titles with today’s release of BIG BAD WOLVES (see our review here), Israeli writer/directors Aharon Keshales and Navot Papushado’s mesmerizing revenge opus. The film has already won praise and awards at numerous festivals, and following its world premiere at last year’s Tribeca Film Fest, Fango sat down with lead actors Tzahi Grad, Rotem Keinan and Dov Glickman to chat about their roles.

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    “DEVIL’S DUE” (Movie Review)

    Has the found-footage genre become so commonplace that moviemakers no longer feel the need to justify why anyone keeps filming? DEVIL’S DUE joins this month’s PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES in presenting scenes from the point of view of cameras whose owners should have long since abandoned the idea of capturing the moment.

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    Q&A: Actor Zach Gilford Talks “DEVIL’S DUE” and “THE PURGE 2”

    After a bumpy start, some may be wondering if 2014 will be as good a year for screen fear as the one before it. Actor Zach Gilford certainly hopes so; the FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS actor has doubled down on the genre this year, enduring hell in this week’s DEVIL’S DUE before entering the battlefield of THE PURGE 2, out June 20. FANGORIA spoke to the busy young actor about his first foray into found footage, and how horror may have been more familiar than he anticipated.

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    [Sundance 2014] Director William Eubank Previews Midnighter, “THE SIGNAL”

    While Sundance has grown intensely in both size and notoriety (likely the first thing that comes to mind when filmgoers hear the term ‘film festival’), it’s retained a significant, definitive quality: the element of surprise. A great many titles of the annual lineup do come with some level of anticipation, be it cast or filmmakers sure, but often its most discussed films seemingly come out of nowhere, flooring audiences and critics alike. In horror alone, this yearly tradition has yielded the likes of THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT and SAW. In keeping with this spirit, Fango has opted to take a look at two films in the 2014 midnight lineup that arrive with little awareness, but may make a big impression. Today, as the curtain raises on Sundance 2014: William Eubank’s THE SIGNAL.

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