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  • Crossing Over: “THE WARRIORS”

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    Welcome, FANGORIA Readers, to CROSSING OVER, our newest column that highlights the films, series and content out there outside of horror that is fashioned towards or pays tribute to our beloved genre. By shining a light onto these projects, FANGORIA hopes to open a world of entertainment perfect for fright fans that lies just beyond the borders of the horror community. So without further ado…

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  • Stream to Scream: “RESIDUE”

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    One of the key differences between American and British television is that in the latter, there’s nearly an instantly immersive element to the storytelling. Whether it’s UTOPIA, BLACK MIRROR or RESIDUE, these genre programs throw the audience into their respective sci-fi/horror worlds with no expectation or preparation. While U.S. programs go to great lengths to establish tone and atmosphere before throwing their characters into their horror-oriented journeys, U.K. horror TV treats its audience almost as adversaries in a game of psychological chess, revealing it’s game plan by the time the checkmate is already in motion. And in the case of the aforementioned RESIDUE, that immersive storytelling is even more engaging when the payoff is that of the supernatural element.

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  • The Value of Nightmares: How The Academy Awards Continue to Ignore Horror

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    It’s no secret within the film industry that the horror genre and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences don’t quite gel together. Although there have been genre films that have penetrated the Academy’s persistent disinterest in horror- such as BLACK SWAN, ROSEMARY’S BABY, SILENCE OF THE LAMBS, JAWS and THE EXORCIST, fright films have often been considered “less than” when compared to Oscar-bait drama and more ambitious, expensive productions. For the most part, the horror side of the film industry has come to accept this divisive relationship, especially considering how much expensive politics come to play in the voting process rather than objective quality. And while the Oscars receives flack from other voices from the industry for their lack of diversity and their susceptibility to traditionally lauded subject matter, there’s a good reason for horror fans to decry the Academy Awards as well, as the transgressions- albeit passive- have gone beyond frustration and into active disrespect.

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  • The Year in Horror, 2015: 13 Frighteningly Good Reads

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    For those not as passionate about dark culture as those of us who gather at this particular on-line oasis, horror-obsessed family and friends can be difficult to shop for—hence the many gift certificates in FANGORIA fiends’ stockings a few weeks back. We’ve already given readers plenty of film purchase options—check out our exquisitely curated lists from Michael Gingold and Ken Hanley—and for dark literature aficionados, 2015 (give or take a month) had plenty to offer too:

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  • The Dreadful Ten: Top 10 Horror Variant Posters!

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    The movie poster has long been an essential element of the horror fan experience. From bootleg posters to foreign imports to photoshop nightmares, a film’s legacy can be made or broken from its poster art, with some real pieces of genre garbage outliving their reputation with fantastic posters. Yet as golden as the days of old are with poster arts, there’s been a real dodgy necessity for palatable, undefined key art to sell films to audiences worldwide, leaving truly talented artists working on commission or on their own accord to provide alternate film posters to the horror community. So for this week’s Dreadful Ten, FANGORIA is ranking down our top 10 horror variant posters for your enjoyment and our adoration!

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  • The Cutting Room: Director Ciaran Foy talks “SINISTER 2”

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    Welcome to THE CUTTING ROOM, a new weekly column on FANGORIA.com that highlights the  stories that most share DNA of our print counterpart. Rather than just feature the articles and interviews that didn’t make the cut, this column is dedicated to providing a greater lifeline between FANGORIA Magazine and FANGORIA.com.

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  • Shadowvision: “DAY OF THE DEAD” (1985)

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    Welcome to Shadowvision, a regular column in which Fangoria.com revisits modern horror films in black and white. The purpose is to analyze these films through a new lens, seeing if the classically informed viewing experience will give a new angle to familiar images. If you’d like to watch along at home, it’s simple: go into your TV settings and desaturate the picture completely, then adjust the contrast and brightness to fit either standard or high definition.

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  • Q&A: Actor James Ransone on Coming Back for “SINISTER 2”

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    The high mortality rate of the first SINISTER left only one key character free to step into the horror hit’s sequel: Now Ex-Deputy So & So, played by returning actor James Ransone in SINISTER 2, just out on Blu-ray and DVD. FANGORIA spoke to Ransone about his expanded role, making the movie and what scared him most on set.

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  • FANTASTICA Presents: Existing with Non-Existence within “ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD”

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    In Tom Stoppard’s now 25-year-old film ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD, the playwright-turned-director does something precious few have ever done: he eschews the format of reality completely. Comparable to say Quentin Dupieux’s equally undefinable dark comedy RUBBER, ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN has no defined rules, no defined roles and coasts along on the oblivious nature of oblivion. And thanks to that attitude, Stoppard does Shakespeare by the way of Gilliam, offering something where the very world where the film exists is so unpredictable that there’s no way of knowing exactly what is at stake, a notion that is simultaneously hilarious, bizarre, tragic, terrifying and amazing.

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  • FANGO Flashback: “NIGHTWATCH” (1997)

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    Following the critical and commercial success of SE7EN, Hollywood was looking for any and all fucked-up serial killer thrillers that could ride on that film’s coattails. With films such as FEAR, KISS THE GIRLS, 8MM and more popping out of the woodwork, finding the fetishistic depravity of possessive serial killers became the M.O. for the genre, with studios looking everywhere for dependable inspiration. And it is likely that search that brought Ole Bornedal to Hollywood to remake his film NIGHTWATCH, a unique, stylish psychological horror-thriller that added a Hitchcockian craftsmanship to otherwise dour, provocative subject matter.

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