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    Q&A: Olivia Cooke talks “OUIJA”

    Currently sitting atop the box office is OUIJA. The modest, suburban set teen scream from Universal and Blumhouse is divisive among horror fans yes, but it’s undoubtedly still endearing to see the kids have come out the last weekend in October for jolts and frights. Which OUIJA does have, thanks to some ghoulish design in its supernatural entities and the emotional authenticity from lead Olivia Cooke. 

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    Shadowvision: “NIGHTBREED: THE DIRECTOR’S CUT”

    Welcome to Shadowvision, a regular column in which Fangoria.com revisits modern horror films in black and white. The purpose is to analyze these films through a new lens, seeing if the classically informed viewing experience will give a new angle to familiar images. If you’d like to watch along at home, it’s simple: go into your TV settings and desaturate the picture completely, then adjust the contrast and brightness to fit either standard or high definition.

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    Q&A: Keanu Reeves enters the “zoo of revenge” as JOHN WICK

    In homage to the film’s eponymous character, let’s dispatch with any namby-pamby vacillations or too-cute flourishes and employ some Bruce Lee-esque economy of motion (and language) here: JOHN WICK is hands down one of the best, most enlivening revenge thrillers to come down the pike in years—a prime-cut of uber-adrenalized, exquisitely realized action filmmaking that not only manages to bridge the gaps between A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE, EASTERN PROMISES, the BOURNE franchise, and the glorious insanity of later DEATH WISH flicks, but also achieves a near-perfect balance of pulse-raising, harrowing combat; heart-rending pathos; absurdist fun; primal, righteous—if somewhat reluctant!—vengeance; and, oh yeah, a body count sure to fill the heads of morticians in the audience with visions of retirement to the south of France. 

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    Guest Blog: “THE ABCs OF DEATH 2″ Director Alejandro Brugues on “ALIEN”

    As a burgeoning series of films, THE ABCs OF DEATH anthologies are predicated on, well death. The wait for it. The horror of it. The humor in it. It’s inevitable, and even in just three or so minutes, the build can be massive. These experimental, sometimes exhausting omnibuses see a massive ensemble of international filmmakers try their hands at the short format and visceral release of onscreen demise. But what put them on this path? What shocking, horrifying, hilarious, titillating filmic expirations influenced them? The directors of THE ABCs OF DEATH 2 are contributing guest blogs on their favorite cinematic deaths to all manner of movie sites. Here at Fango, JUAN OF THE DEAD helmer Alejandro Brugués writes of his.

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    Q&A: Sean Hogan, on the Long-Awaited U.S. Bow of “THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS”

    In 2011, an intimate, brisk, affecting film unspooled at festivals around the world and introduced many audiences to UK talent Sean Hogan. The director of LIE STILL (unfortunately retitled to THE HAUNTING OF 24 in the U.S.), who had also just contributed to transgressive anthology LITTLE DEATHS, seemed poised to break through in a heavier manner. After all, his THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS was a literary, thoughtful piece of horror, one looking to enthrall and ultimately repulse, ending on a particularly eerie note. 

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    Q&A: Actors Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams on Surviving “THE PURGE: ANARCHY”

    Writer/director James DeMonaco’s sequel THE PURGE: ANARCHY (just out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal) expands the scope of the housebound original to explore how the violent annual ritual affects a wider range of people. Two of the key participants are played by Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams, who sat down with FANGORIA to discuss their characters.

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    30 for 31: “MESSIAH OF EVIL”

    A lot of strange films came out of those old hippie days. Though film was once considered the medium of old white dudes, the 1960s opening of countless film schools made it accessible to the younger generation. Young filmmakers of the late ’60s and early ’70s were treading into a new field, and ss an artistic expression this new generation created films based on experimentation, surrealism, and sometimes hippie-cult panic. These sentiments were echoed in the horror realm in flicks like LET’S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH, I DRINK YOUR BLOOD, and, my favorite of the lot, MESSIAH OF EVIL.

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    Festival Report: One Night “AFTER DARK”

    As you may or may not be aware, every year the city of Toronto hosts an annual International film festival. It’s a gargantuan undertaking that envelops the city’s downtown each September; the streets teem like anthills with filmgoers, volunteers, scenesters, advertisers, paparazzi, autograph hunters, and the average citizenry standing and gawping at whatever celestial deities have descended from the firmament that week. 

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