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    “INHUMAN RESOURCES”: Tom Savini sees “Redd,” Part Two

    It must be kismet. Horror/makeup FX king Tom Savini, a hero to FANGORIA readers since we first profiled him in the very first issue of the mag in 1979, appears in and supervised the FX for INHUMAN RESOURCES (formerly REDD INC), the first “volume” of FANGORIA Presents’ new VOD/DVD label; see here http://www.fangoria.com/new/fango-presents/ for details). INHUMAN RESOURCES follows a deranged corporate manager/convicted serial killer Thomas Reddmann (Nicholas Hope) who kidnaps six people and holds them hostage in a deserted office. Soon the tortures begin, but all is not what it seems… Fango caught up with Savini in Australia during production of his latest splatter flick, and you can see part one of this interview here .

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    “INHUMAN RESOURCES”: Tom Savini sees “Redd,” Part One

    Tom Savini is one name Fangorians and even average horror fans should instantly recognize. In person the makeup FX maven is incredibly enthusiastic for everything. He’s in possession of a childlike wonder that is constantly in use (he names the furry cover this writer uses on the microphone on his faithful recording device, “Basil”), and he exudes an energy that you can see has obviously got him through the worst days on set.

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    Fango Flashback: “WHO CAN KILL A CHILD?” (1976)

    Perhaps the strongest aspect of Narcisco Ibáñez Serrador’s WHO CAN KILL A CHILD? is its decision to trade backstory for context. There’s no explicit, supernatural reason for the juvenile murderous rampage on the island of Almanzora, but if you’re looking for an explanation why, the real world horrors of the opening titles are a good, if grim, place to start.

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    Q&A: “COME OUT AND PLAY” producer Diego Luna

    Diego Luna faced a couple of challenges as one of the producers of COME OUT AND PLAY: helping to reinvent the 1976 Spanish cult classic WHO COULD KILL A CHILD? for a modern audience, and dealing with the new movie’s, shall we say, unique writer/director, the film artist known only as Makinov. Luna discusses these issues and more in this exclusive interview.

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    Q&A: Stacy Keach talks “THE NINTH CONFIGURATION”

    Defying genre to provide a one-of-a-kind film experience, 1980’s THE NINTH CONFIGURATION is a twisted, trippy film experience from the creator of THE EXORCIST. To celebrate a special screening at New York City’s Lincoln Center this week, which will include a Skype chat with star Stacy Keach, Fango talked to Keach about his experiences on the Budapest-lensed production.

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    Q&A: Director Peter Grendle on Southwestern Neo-Nazi horror “BLOOD SOAKED”

    New Mexico-based low-budget indie filmmaker Peter Grendle has finished his latest feature, BLOOD SOAKED, a gritty tale set in the sun-bleached desert of the American Southwest about what occurs when coed lesbians encounter Neo-Nazis, and the subsequent chaos that unfolds. FANGO chatted with Grendle about his inspiration and the production process behind this freaky flick.

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    Q&A: Dallas Roberts on “SHADOW PEOPLE” and “WALKING DEAD”

    The actor currently seen each week experimenting on zombies in AMC’s THE WALKING DEAD gets freaked out by more nebulous beings in SHADOW PEOPLE, which hits DVD and Blu-ray tomorrow and a free FANGORIA screening in Manhattan tonight, courtesy of Anchor Bay. The actor, who will appear at that showing, took some time to discuss both projects with us, along with last year’s acclaimed chiller THE GREY.

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    Q&A: “MY AMITYVILLE HORROR” director Eric Walter

    The true story of what happened in the infamous Amityville house is scarier and more compelling than any of the movies based on it—at least as told by survivor Daniel Lutz in MY AMITYVILLE HORROR. As the acclaimed documentary hits select theaters and digital outlets today from IFC Films under the IFC Midnight banner, we have exclusive words with its director below.

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    FANGO FUNHOUSE: Paul Scheer on the horrifying, the hilarious and the horrible!

    As any true fright fan can tell you, horror and comedy go together like monsters and sequels, often bleeding into one another in such iconic genre offerings such as the EVIL DEAD sequels, SHAUN OF THE DEAD and GHOSTBUSTERS. Whether it’s an unexpected kill after an inspiration speech or the supernatural indulging in macabre mischief, few can argue that the subversive nature of both genres compliment each other with relative ease. Therefore, I welcome you, dear reader, to FANGO FUNHOUSE, a look into the co-dependent world of horror-comedy through those who know it best.

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    DAMIANO DAMIANI, 1922-2013

    A lot of artists are sometimes trapped by their race and/or their heritage; auteurs outside of America that make superlative and innovative films are often quoted as “French director” or “German expressionist” and sometimes these people would just for once like to hear “director” or “expressionist” as a sole description, leaving the nation of origin out. Race, for many of these artists, shouldn’t matter. And this was the case for Damiano Damiani, a versatile and groundbreaking filmmaker, who passed away March 7th at his home in Rome age 90.

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    DO YOU LIKE HITCHCOCK?

    March 12th is National Alfred Hitchcock Day, and while suspense-savvy FANGORIA readers hardly need to be pointed to a top-ten of Hitchcock films, we thought we’d take advantage of the opportunity to revisit some Hitch-related ephemera that made its debut on the small screen. No, we’re not talking about the classic ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS – which ran from 1955-1965 and effectively cemented Hitch’s status as the first movie director to become a household name – but its less-celebrated rejuvenation in the 1980s – THE NEW ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS!

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    SONIC CELLULOID: An interview with ORGASMO SONORE

    Earlier this winter I had the pleasure of attending the record release party for Montreal-based Orgasmo Sonore’s sophomore album REVISITING OBSCURE FILM MUSIC VOLUME 2 (you can catch a video snippet of the show at orgasmo-sonore.blogspot.ca). Led by François Riendeau – aka Frank Rideau – Orgasmo Sonore is an ongoing musical project that reimagines cult film soundtrack compositions, and aside from impressive technical proficiency and Rideau is also clearly a brilliant musical curator, his selection of covers over the two albums thus far ranging from Alain Goraguer (FANTASTIC PLANET) to Mikis Theodorakis (Costa-Gavras’ Z) alongside a heady roster of Italo-staples including Ennio Morricone, Stelvio Cipriani, Fabio Frizzi, Goblin, Bruno Nicolai and more.

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