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  • The Dreadful Ten: Top 10 Cannibal Films!

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    No matter how jaded horror fans can be at times, there’s little denying the satisfaction true horror hounds feel in the return of cannibal fare in the genre. With HANNIBAL redefining TV (and FANGORIA #343) and Eli Roth’s highly anticipated love letter to classic cannibal fare, THE GREEN INFERNO, coming to theaters from BH Tilt on September 25th, not only are macabre man-eaters back in the zeitgeist, but they’re back in all of their grisly gory. And to commemorate the return of cannibal cinema, FANGORIA has decided to commemorate the various flesh-eating frighteners from horror history with this week’s Dreadful Ten!

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  • Flesh and Blood: “INNOCENT BLOOD” [NSFW]

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    As any fright fan knows, the horror genre has a particularly salacious relationship with sexually explicit content. And while nudity so often goes side by side with decapitated heads and brutal bloodletting, there are also horror filmmakers throughout the years who made an art form out of the human body with an appreciation of our most lurid and lucid desires. And it’s with that macabre mentality in mind that FANGORIA is proud to announce our partnership with Mr. Skin for a brand new NSFW column that looks to provoke our minds as well as our more physical impulses, FLESH AND BLOOD!

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  • Q&A: Filmmakers Explore the Twinsanity of Their Acclaimed Euroshocker “GOODNIGHT MOMMY”

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    Elias and Lukas, the dangerously determined children at the center of GOODNIGHT MOMMY, share a close bond, and so do the Austrian chiller’s writer/directors, Severin Fiala and Veronika Franz. FANGORIA spoke to the filmmakers about the movie’s true-life inspirations, casting challenges and more.

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  • Crossing Over: M. Night Shyamalan’s “UNBREAKABLE”

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    Welcome, FANGORIA Readers, to CROSSING OVER, our newest column that highlights the films, series and content out there outside of horror that is fashioned towards or pays tribute to our beloved genre. By shining a light onto these projects, FANGORIA hopes to open a world of entertainment perfect for fright fans that lies just beyond the borders of the horror community. So without further ado…

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  • Week of Wes: “THE HILLS HAVE EYES PART 2”, “VAMPIRE IN BROOKLYN” & “CURSED”

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    Though his track record is far from perfect, there’s not a single ounce of this writer that believes Wes Craven would purposefully craft a bad film. Out of the many horror filmmakers from throughout the years, there’s few that came under studio scrutiny as much as Craven, and even fewer that had bona fide hits beforehand as well. And Craven, for all of his exploration of fear and dread, was not a filmmaker simply mesmerized by horror: he wanted to find a richer idea among the terror, even if it was ambitious beyond the means of his budget.

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  • FANGO Flashback: “I, MADMAN”

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    For hardcore horror fans, it’s easy to understand the appeal and fascination with pulp horror. The vivid colors, the over-the-top villains, the sardonic twists on morality plays; they were Grimm Fairy Tales but with a flamboyant sense of humor for a very repressed generation. And yet these tales often stand the test of time as their surreal, kitschy stories tap into a part of our imagination that is underserved, giving way to such memorably macabre movies as CREEPSHOW, TALES FROM THE CRYPT and I, MADMAN.

    I, MADMAN is the least known of the bunch, but undeservedly so: the film operates in a post-NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET slasher mold but with a perfect balance between cartoonish fun and savage, FX-friendly violence. The film follows a young woman (played by NEAR DARK’s Jenny Wright) who is enthralled with golden age pulp horror novels, drawn to the creatures and images she creates in her own head. However, upon becoming affixed on one novel in particular entitled “I, MADMAN” about a mad doctor turned serial killer, the woman begins having vivid visions of the killer targeting her own friends, and believes she may have unleashed the fictional killer into her reality.

    While the aesthetics are very familiar to horror filmmakers of its era, particularly Joe Dante, Dario Argento and Wes Craven, I, MADMAN is a very fun film, dripping with EC Comics influence and a ghoulish creation in Dr. Kessler. But perhaps what makes the film really stand out among its peers is how confident the film is with its fantasy elements, whether its the introduction of a wall-bound monster from stop-motion animation or the frenetic camerawork that creates a larger than life atmosphere. Furthermore, by giving Dr. Kessler insane, obsessive monologues, the character feels much more alive than the slasher villains of the times, even if his methods are much more visceral and macabre than the standard mad doctor character.

    I Madman still 1

    In a lot of ways, I, MADMAN is even evocative of psychological horror: if the film’s final twist was to reveal Jenny Wright’s character as a schizophrenic killer, it wouldn’t feel out of place whatsoever. In fact, part of the fun of I, MADMAN is weaving through the paranoia on display, whether it be through the young woman, her detective boyfriend or the cops at large who are investigating these murders. Factor in the vintage horror elements, including much of the art direction and the gorgeous, heightened cinematography, and I, MADMAN is a film that feels like it belongs on a much stronger nostalgia trip than its current state as an obscure horror offering.

    The film, directed by THE GATE’s Tibor Takacs, reeks of imaginative gusto even if it doesn’t quite reek of originality; in fact, with slight adjustments, I, MADMAN could exist in the universe of WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? just as well as it could TALES FROM THE CRYPT. Part of this might come from some of the more Amblin-esque technical aspects, whether it’s the rousing score from Michael Hoenig to Bryan England’s perpetually curious cinematography even to the impressive effects from Frank Ceglia. But even the performances feel devoted to the colorful material, including Wright and co-stars Clayton Rohner and a very sinister Randall William Cook.

    After viewing I, MADMAN, it’s still a mystery how this film didn’t become a word-of-mouth cult success upon its release, although the use of a high concept narrative and a lack of star power could have something to do with it. Had the film waited a year or two until after the HBO series of TALES FROM THE CRYPT instead of angling for a slasher appeal after the subgenre had waned, perhaps we’d be talking about I, MADMAN in a completely different light. However, the film’s status among horror aficianados has certainly grown over the years, and with the film recently getting the Scream Factory Blu-ray treatment, there’s no better time than now to discover this demented fright flick.

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  • Week of Wes: “SERPENT”, “SHOCKER” and “STAIRS”

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    Following the success of A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, one would expect Wes Craven’s prominence in the horror genre to lead to bigger and better things. However, as many independent filmmakers who lept into the studio system can tell you, it’s not surprising that Craven was met with immediate frustration. Of course, Craven is clever enough to play the system to their expectations, never passing up an opportunity to explore the genre he had been dubbed a visionary within.

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  • Q&A: “CABIN IN THE WOODS’ ” Fran Kranz Finds Work Sucks in “BLOODSUCKING BASTARDS”

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    BLOODSUCKING BASTARDS, the new horror/comedy directed by Brian James O’Connell and written by the improvisational comedy troupe Dr. God and Ryan Mitts, stars Fran Kranz—Marty in CABIN IN THE WOODS and Topher in DOLLHOUSE—as Evan, the only person in his boring sales office who cares about his job. His workplace becomes more professional and productive, as well as considerably more dangerous and gore-filled, when Evan’s old college nemesis Max (GAME OF THRONES’ Pedro Pascal) gets the promotion Evan thought was his.

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  • FIOFF ’15 Submissions to Die For: Timothy Hall’s “THE STUDIO”

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    Welcome to SUBMISSIONS TO DIE FOR, the latest column focusing on highlights among the FANGORIA International Online Film Festival Submissions. While being featured on this column does not guarantee selection in the FANGORIA International Online Film Festival, SUBMISSIONS TO DIE FOR features some scare fare worth keeping an eye on…

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  • Week of Wes: “THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT” / “THE HILLS HAVE EYES”

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    Personally speaking, this writer feels that Wes Craven simply does not get enough credit for his versatility as a director. Many think that because several of his high-concept horror films were also notorious failures (sorry, VAMPIRE IN BROOKLYN and CURSED) that Craven is best known for being the savior of the slasher genre… twice. However, a mere look at his filmography can provide any fright fan with an ambitious, incredible filmography of truly different films: DEADLY BLESSING, THE PEOPLE UNDER THE STAIRS, SHOCKER, RED EYE; even the SCREAM quadrilogy feels different each entries’ cinematic voice.

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  • Q&A: Creators Talk the Controversial British Horror Film “THE BLOOD LANDS”

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    Sometimes events conspire to give a small film more attention than anyone anticipated. Such was the case with THE BLOOD LANDS, the low-budget British home-invasion thriller (originally titled WHITE SETTLERS) that hit Stateside Blu-ray and DVD this week on Magnolia Home Entertainment’s Magnet label.

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  • Surprise MHHFF 2015 Announcement: Rare Unrated 35mm Screening of “HATCHET” w/ live Green & Hodder Q&A!

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    Yesterday, FANGORIA and Mile High Horror Film Festival 2015 proudly announced the first wave of programming for the anticipated Colorado-based event as well as a 10th Anniversary Screening of THE DEVIL’S REJECTS with a live Sid Haig Q&A. However, for those thinking that would be it for this week’s announcements, think again, as FANGORIA is excited to report that MHHFF 2015 will be hosting a rare screening of the Unrated 35mm cut of Adam Green’s HATCHET, which will be followed by a live Q&A with Green and star Kane Hodder!

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