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    Q&A: Sean Hogan, on the Long-Awaited U.S. Bow of “THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS”

    In 2011, an intimate, brisk, affecting film unspooled at festivals around the world and introduced many audiences to UK talent Sean Hogan. The director of LIE STILL (unfortunately retitled to THE HAUNTING OF 24 in the U.S.), who had also just contributed to transgressive anthology LITTLE DEATHS, seemed poised to break through in a heavier manner. After all, his THE DEVIL’S BUSINESS was a literary, thoughtful piece of horror, one looking to enthrall and ultimately repulse, ending on a particularly eerie note. 

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    Q&A: Actors Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams on Surviving “THE PURGE: ANARCHY”

    Writer/director James DeMonaco’s sequel THE PURGE: ANARCHY (just out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal) expands the scope of the housebound original to explore how the violent annual ritual affects a wider range of people. Two of the key participants are played by Carmen Ejogo and Michael K. Williams, who sat down with FANGORIA to discuss their characters.

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    30 for 31: “MESSIAH OF EVIL”

    A lot of strange films came out of those old hippie days. Though film was once considered the medium of old white dudes, the 1960s opening of countless film schools made it accessible to the younger generation. Young filmmakers of the late ’60s and early ’70s were treading into a new field, and ss an artistic expression this new generation created films based on experimentation, surrealism, and sometimes hippie-cult panic. These sentiments were echoed in the horror realm in flicks like LET’S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH, I DRINK YOUR BLOOD, and, my favorite of the lot, MESSIAH OF EVIL.

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    Festival Report: One Night “AFTER DARK”

    As you may or may not be aware, every year the city of Toronto hosts an annual International film festival. It’s a gargantuan undertaking that envelops the city’s downtown each September; the streets teem like anthills with filmgoers, volunteers, scenesters, advertisers, paparazzi, autograph hunters, and the average citizenry standing and gawping at whatever celestial deities have descended from the firmament that week. 

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    30 for 31: “POPCORN” (1991)

    I’m thrilled to see 1991’s POPCORN finding a new pulse with a whole new generation of viewers. The film just recently screened as part of Los Angeles’s Beyond Fest, and Synapse has a snazzy Blu-ray of the movie coming in early 2015, which is awesome considering this film previously never made it past the original VHS release. This loving tribute to gimmick films of the 1950s and 60s, predating Joe Dante’s MATINEE, is as gruesome as it is fun. 

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    Shadowvision: “DRESSED TO KILL”

    Welcome to Shadowvision, a regular column in which Fangoria.com revisits modern horror films in black-and-white. The purpose is to analyze these films through a new lens, seeing if the classically informed viewing experience will give a new angle to familiar images. If you’d like to watch along at home, it’s simple: go into your TV settings and desaturate the picture completely, then adjust the contrast and brightness to fit either standard or high definition.

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    Q&A: Checking in with Rob Zombie and “31”

    If I’m honest, I don’t know why exactly musician and filmmaker Rob Zombie is presently doing a round of interviews. The performer is currently in the midst of recording a new album, as well as running a polarizing crowdfunding campaign for 70s set Halloween-horror 31, yes, but neither are at a stage of completion. If anything, the opportunity seemed one to simply “check in” with Rob Zombie, one that fans and FANGORIA would take advantage of regardless. 

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    30 for 31: “SSSSSSS”

    The Season of the Witch is upon us, ye olde FANGORIA readers! To many, Halloween means candy, costumes and creepshows of all sorts. But to the staff at FANGORIA, Halloween can mean something more entirely. Therefore, we present 30 for 31, in which FANGORIA recounts the cinema that most strongly represents what Halloween means to us.

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    TIFF Q&A: Producer Jan Harlan Remembers Kubrick’s “EYES WIDE SHUT”

    This Halloween, the fine folks at TIFF (Toronto International Film Festival) are taking over their central nerve center, the TIFF Bell Lightbox, to honor the legacy of legendary filmmaker Stanley Kubrick with a multi-tier exhibit featuring rare photographs and letters, original props and costumes, screenplays, production materials, and cameras from the director’s nearly 50-year career. 

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    30 for 31: “DEAD OF NIGHT” (1977)

    Like many great discoveries throughout history, I stumbled upon DEAD OF NIGHT completely by accident. I was actually trying to hunt down a copy of Simon Hunter’s DEAD OF NIGHT from 1999, and knowing how rare and expensive that film could be, I headed to my favorite video store in hopes of renting it instead of having to plunk down over $50 for a copy. I asked the owner (who is pretty much a living version of Internet Movie Database), if they had DEAD OF NIGHT (1999), and to my surprise, they had hundreds of movie called “Dead of Night”!

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