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    Q&A: Ortiz, Ramirez & Valderrama on their time in the “SANITARIUM”

    The anthology film has become somewhat of a boon for up-and-coming horror filmmakers, acting as a way to present short format work as an affordable calling card without the limitation of exposure that hinders short films. Anthologies also give these filmmakers, many of whom are rooted in the independent scene, creative freedom that they normally wouldn’t get in a longer form project with higher budgets and more production scrutiny. Furthermore, the pressure of putting together a feature film is often spread over more than one filmmaker, which in and of itself can allow the director to focus on the necessary aspects of storytelling.

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    The Year in Horror: The Scariest Moments of 2013

    2013 was a banner year for horror, with successes on both the critical and commercial fronts from early winter right up until now, as horror season prepares to rev up once more. Amongst these films were some truly scary moments, some of which will rarely leave this author’s memory anytime soon. So as for a little bit of fun, here are this writer’s picks for the top ten scariest moments, from 2013’s most chilling cinematic offerings.

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    The Year in Horror, 2013: Rebekah McKendry’s Best Of

    2013 was a great year for indies. Studio horror pics were still there setting box office records, but the smaller films are the ones that fans clung to and championed. We also saw a burst of horror on television. Granted, SLEEPY HOLLOW, DRACULA, and others may not have been my first choice for scares, but just seeing the major networks support the genre warmed my horror-loving heart. This was also an unexpected year, as many of the films on my list, I honestly did not expect to love as much as I did. Here’s to continuing that trend in 2014!

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    The Year in Horror, 2013: Ken Hanley’s Top Films

    It’s Christmas Time here at FANGORIA, and that means our year is rapidly exiting this mortal coil in order to bring us even more gruesome goodness in 2014. More importantly, it means we get to reflect on the year behind us, think about the things we liked and put them into lists in order to spur petty arguments and superfluous agreements!

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    The Year in Horror, 2013: Chris Alexander’s Top Films

    One of the pleasures of loving horror cinema is defining exactly what a horror movie is. Let’s face it, many of our most beloved morbid masterpieces were not considered horror films by their helmers, the very word “horror” deemed to be a grotty ghetto bottom feeder genre by many. To me, horror is that swelling feeling of dread and terror. It’s the sadness of death, the misery of shocking violent death, the anxiety about the “other”—whether an external, or internal, threat—and often, just the sheer phantasmagorical punch of seeing things that do not, and cannot exist, in the natural world suddenly run rampant before our eyes.

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    The Year in Horror, 2013: Sam’s Top Films

    2013: a year in which I loved a lot of films, but treasured only one.  I’ve carried STOKER with me through all twelve months, having been swept up in Chan-wook Park’s artistry on a very early January morning in Park City, Utah. I entertained the possibility then, that a full calendar could yield something as stunning (many came close), but I knew. I knew this engrossing, prodigiously composed and entirely warped gothic tale of understanding yourself and who you come from would take it all. Thus, similar to last year, it’s not very fruitful to assign meaningless numbers to this list. If anything stands above, it’s STOKER. The films that proceeded to make incredible impact shouldn’t be delineated by anything other than alphabetical order.

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    Close Encounters with Abel Ferrara

    As many of you may know, Drafthouse Films is re-releasing somewhat forgotten exploitation classic, MS. 45 (in select theaters this Friday, including one hosted by FANGORIA’s own Michael Gingold in Yonkers) from the prolific and gritty independent legend Abel Ferrara. Upon hearing this, I was quite excited, as I have always been a fan of Mr. Ferrara’s work and this had been especially hard to track down. Yet, while fishing for details regarding the release, I told my FANGORIA cohorts that my history with Abel was not merely one of fandom. Through a series of weird events, I had not only had several weird run-in’s with Mr. Ferrara, but had actually at one point directed him as an actor.

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    Q&A: Sonja Kinski talks “DIAMOND ON VINYL”

    When you sport the surname Kinski, preconceptions of your character will follow. Just ask Sonja. The talented, beautiful young actress and model is the daughter of TESS and CAT PEOPLE star Nastassja Kinski and the granddaughter of the late, towering, talented and by all accounts rather mad Teutonic acting legend Klaus Kinski (NOSFERATU PHANTOM DER NACHT, FITZCARALDO, THE GREAT SILENCE and CRAWLSPACE, recently re-released on Blu-ray by SCREAM Factory). It goes to follow that when people learn of the younger Kinski’s lineage, fascination and maybe even intimidation will get the better of them. This writer, an ardent admirer and obsessive of the elder Kinski’s work especially, admits to such nerves when  he found himself depressing a series of buttons that made up her phone number for a scheduled interview last week.

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    FANGORIA Flashback: “THEY LIVE”

    Would you bite the hand that feeds you? What if that hand belonged to an extraterrestrial force that controls your mind via consumerism? That’s the question on the mind of genre maestro John Carpenter in his satirical alien-infiltration thriller THEY LIVE, which is being screened for one week only for its 25th anniversary at New York City’s IFC Center (323 Avenue of the Americas at West 3rd Street) starting Friday, December 6. In commemoration of that anniversary, FANGORIA takes a look back at Carpenter’s hybrid of clever science fiction, intense horror and kick-ass action.

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