LOGO
  • ,,,

    Fango Funhouse: Judah Friedlander talks “FEAST,” “FEVER” and Frights!

    As any true fright fanatic can tell you, horror and comedy go together like monsters and sequels, often bleeding into one another in such iconic genre offerings such as the DEAD ALIVE, AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON and CREEPSHOW. Whether it’s oddly timed decapitation or the bickering undead, few can argue that the subversive nature of both genres compliment each other with relative ease. Therefore, I welcome you, dear reader, to FANGO FUNHOUSE, a look into the co-dependent world of horror-comedy through those who know it best.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Con Report: Motor City Nightmares rocks Detroit

    To say that Detroit, Michigan has a reputation can be a drastic understatement. Known to most as the murder capital of the nation, Detroit may have earned its pessimistic moniker, but it’s a name seemingly pulled from the urban decay of a glass half empty. Lest we forget the top of this glass: The half that is filled with the fastest cars and loudest rock ‘n’ roll to ever blaze this planet? For a number of years, Tommy Brunswick has been hard at work putting Detroit back on the map of optimism with one blood splattered Michigan mitten shape at a time. She’s a filmmaker, she’s an entrepreneur and she’s co-founder of the ever-expanding horror convention, Motor City Nightmares.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “THE TRIBE: HOMEROOM HEADHUNTERS” (Book Review)

    Spencer Pendleton is starting out at a new Junior High and now has to cope with all the miseries attached: cocky bullies, snobby princesses, crabby teachers, and flare-ups of his asthma. While struggling to fit in with his indifferent classmates, Spence attracts the notice of a very unique clique, former students who’ve slipped the noose of the school system by forming a stylized native gang, burrowing in behind the drab walls and acoustical ceiling tiles of their building and sourcing weapons from discarded detritus like middle school Mad Maxes. Now this clan of tween terrors wants a new recruit to share in their agenda of disruption and disobedience, and Spence must make the choice between accepting a numbingly normal scholastic career or seizing the chance to truly belong to something for once in his life.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “TEN GRAND” #1 (Comic Review)

    In the wide world of comics, Noir and Horror have sat down to drink more often than one would think. From John Constanine’s globe-trotting, mystical escapades to Cal McDonald’s ghoulish case files, paranormal mystery men have become a staple of the medium as much as superheroes and tragic origins. With the recent launch of TEN GRAND, we are once again reminded why the world seems endlessly fascinated with a dimly lit bar and a sob story. A work mixing striking visuals and strong writing, it joins Image Comics’ recent fascination for bizarre crime stories, most notably, CHIN MUSIC written by Steve Niles and FATALE from Ed Brubaker. Though it has yet to be seen if it will pick up as much steam as its predecessors, it can be safely assumed TEN GRAND might stick around for the long run.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    CONCENTRATED RAGE UNDER A MAGNIFYING GLASS: Underground Cartoonist Rick Trembles remembers Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)

    It doesn’t matter that I never managed to become a stop-motion animation special effects monster movie maker myself. You see, because of Ray Harryhausen, that’s what I desperately wanted to be when I grew up. It doesn’t matter that his medium’s been obsolete for decades. Despite his passing, I will continue to obsessively hunt down any information I can find on the techniques he mastered till the day I die, as if I were about to embark on my own dream-Dynamation extravaganza any second now. I still want to be Ray Harryhausen one day.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “MUTE” (Book Review)

    Leo, the protagonist of Jeffrey Hale’s MUTE (Grand Mal Press) is special. Born with the power of psychometry, he’s able to divulge past emotions and memories that may still resonate within objects or people. This talent, while admittedly handy, has gotten him locked up in a mental institution by folks not inclined to encourage psychic gifts.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    At the mountains of metal: Lovecraft goes bronze!

    Although H.P. Lovecraft has been dead for over 75 years, the author’s influence has seeped into every aspect of horror culture, whether it be film, literature, theater or art. Now, thanks to sculptor Bryan Moore and filmmaker Jovanka Vuckovic, the author’s visage will remain as everlasting as his work in the form of a life-sized bronze bust, set to permanently reside outside the Providence Athenaeum Library in Rhode Island. However, there is one catch: they need your help to make it happen!

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “JUDGE DREDD: YEAR ONE” #2 (Comic Review)

    Despite the overwhelming artistic success of Judge Dredd in the UK, there have been few attempts to work with the character stateside. DC comics had a short run with the gun-toting officer in the mid-90s, but unfortunately only lasted a whopping eighteen issues before getting shut down. That’s not to say that the Judge did not explode as a media gold mine, ranging from toys and video games to books and movies. Though as far comic books go, he never quite generated the same interest as he did abroad. But, perhaps thanks in part to the new DREDD movie, he has once again been given a chance to show off his trademark brand of justice in one of the latest IDW Publishing additions, JUDGE DREDD: YEAR ONE.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Q+A: Stephen Volk on Cushing tribute novella “WHITSTABLE”

    Perhaps best known for his screenwriting work (GOTHIC, GHOSTWATCH, THE AWAKENING) Stephen Volk has also become increasingly prominent as a writer of short genre fiction. His new novella WHITSTABLE tells a fictionalised tale of horror legend Peter Cushing encountering a real-life monster; not in a Transylvanian castle, but in a humdrum English seaside town. An empathic, deeply melancholic work, WHITSTABLE sensitively handles not only its account of everyday, domestic horrors, but also the character of Cushing himself: a decent, dignified man racked with grief over the death of his beloved wife Helen. Perhaps the highest compliment I can pay the book is that it manages to capture the essence of what has made Peter Cushing so beloved amongst successive generations of genre fans, and in the centenary of his birth, he could receive no finer tribute.

    Read more »
Back to Top