LOGO
  • ,,

    A note on NYC play, “FRANKENSTEIN UPSTAIRS”

    Modern extensions of classic monster mythos are rarely enthralling. Often, it’s the straining to connect, or continue that story and losing sight of what should be the focus — this story’s characters and heart —that does it in. Admittedly, that unavoidable exposition is where Mac Rogers’ new play, FRANKENSTEIN UPSTAIRS feels slightly bogged down, but it’s sure not lacking in character, heart or an intense emotional center. Now playing at the Secret Theatre, the show marries domestic drama and horror story with both wit and tragedy, drawing you in with the former before breaking you down in its second act.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Stephen King’s “JOYLAND” (Book Review)

    After an uncharacteristically quiet 2012, author and multimedia brand Stephen King is resurfacing with a diverse slate of projects: From the UNDER THE DOME TV adaptation to the big-screen remake of CARRIE to the long-awaited musical theatre experiment GHOST BROTHERS OF DARKLAND COUNTY to King’s risky revisit with THE SHINING’s Danny Torrance in this fall’s novel DOCTOR SLEEP. While most of the aforementioned projects have yet to see release, it’s safe to declare that King’s new paperback original JOYLAND (out now from Hard Case Crime/Titan) will most likely be judged the runt of 2013’s considerable litter.

    Read more »
  • ,,,

    TRUE BLOOD DRINKS AND BITES (Book Review)

    I have to admit this first:  I have been cold toward the HBO show TRUE BLOOD ever since they had the nerve to kill off Christopher Meloni’s character, Roman, mid-freakin-season this past year. As time heals all wounds, I’ve been debating whether I should get back into the show and finish off the second half of this past season, finally catching up before the new season starts on June 16th.  As luck would have it, here I find myself reviewing a cookbook that is designed around the show.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    MF Gallery: Ten Years of Monstrous Art

    This summer, Brooklyn’s MF Gallery is celebrating 10 years of showcasing art inspired by horror, monsters, toys and other dark/pop culture. To mark the anniversary, Fango sat down with founders/owners Martina Secondo Russo and Frank Russo (with their beautiful baby boy Joe Butch Russo) to talk about the last decade, and what the next one may hold…

    Read more »
  • ,

    “DEAD ISLAND: RIPTIDE” (Video Game Review)

    Zombie games have exploded over the past few years. With such titles a LEFT 4 DEAD and  DEAD RISING leading the pack, the primarily PC platform company Techland has also jumped on-board the gore freight train with DEAD ISLAND and its current follow-up DEAD ISLAND: RIPTIDE. RIPTIDE follows the five main characters as they attempt to survive another zombie outbreak while scavenging for items on an infested tourist island. A blood-and-guts filled detour into an undead Hell, this first person, survival action game has received mixed reaction from both fans and critics, yet still manages to satisfy a hankering to stab and slash the walking dead.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Read Empire Magazine’s fantastic History of FANGORIA piece right here!

    In the April 2013 issue of UK’s Empire, the world’s biggest movie mag, writer Owen Williams delved into the history and legacy of FANGORIA. A great piece, “Fango Unchained” profiles the longest running horror and cult magazine going and speaks with influential Editor Emeritus Tony Timpone, inaugural editors Ed Naha and Bob Martin, longtime managing editor Michael Gingold, our current editor-in-chief Chris Alexander, president Tom DeFeo and more! It’s a “warts and all,” thorough look at all that’s gone on and still is, and Empire has graciously allowed us to reprint in full below.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    Joseph D’Lacey’s “ROADKILL” (Book Review)

    Following on the heels of their previous chapbook release (Conrad Williams’ unsettling THE FOX – see our review HERE), This Is Horror return with Joseph D’Lacey’s ROADKILL, an existential tale of automotive dark fantasy. The story contains little in the way of actual horror, demonstrating that the publisher refuses to be limited by any generic boundaries one might infer from their name; an admirable undertaking, although one that pays mixed dividends in this latest publication.

    Read more »
  • ,,

    “Shadows In The Asylum: The Case Files Of Dr. Charles Marsh” (Book Review)

    Author D.A. Stern has a history of pushing some envelopes with his writing. Perhaps his best-known book, THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT: A DOSSIER, took an unusual approach to presenting the background of the witch, accounts of the filmmakers’ disappearance, and almost 40 pages of journal. Along the way, the reader absorbs a deeper understanding of all of the disparate elements that made up the movie. Stern employs many of the same ideas to create SHADOWS IN THE ASYLUM: THE CASE FILES OF DR. CHARLES MARSH, and the result is one of the creepiest reads around.

    Read more »
Back to Top