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  • “SELF STORAGE” (Comic Book Review)

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    451 Comics is really doing a service for fans of graphic novels and the like. By taking inspired, cinematic scripts and stories stuck in the Hollywood development system and giving them the comic book treatment, they’re not only providing writers with an uncompromising creative outlet, but they’re giving fans the chance to read content that hasn’t been noted and watered down to death by executives. Instead, they get truly great, mature storytelling with a look that reads in a way not unlike cinema, and if you’re a horror fan, you’ll get something like Clay Mcleod Chapman’s SELF STORAGE.

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  • “BILL AND TED GO TO HELL #2” (Comic Book Review)

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    If you were ever a child of the eighties or just simply a fan of Keanu Reeves back when he was still a surfing wild child, Bill S. Preston, Esquire and Ted “Theodore” Logan should be names you are intimately aware of. With sweet guitar riffs and totally bodacious babes, BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE and its sequel BILL AND TED’S BOGUS JOURNEY  have been cult favorites for twenty five years, with a rumored threequel that could bring a new generation of fans into its fold. Yet, while we wait to see if the rumors are true, BOOM! Studios has given us a peak into what these two rude dudes have been up to, and let’s just say, it’s most atrocious.  

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  • “SHADOW GLASS #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    The Renaissance brought a lot of things to the world: math, science, big poofy collars, the end to that Debbie-downer known as the Middle Ages (I mean, right?). But despite its contribution to modern thought, it wasn’t all ballads and tight pants. With every step forward in progression, a deep undercurrent of hate and paranoia swept along its ruddy sewers, most notably with the early modern witch-hunts. For every pious Christian, there were five witches swarming around, eating babies and banging Satan; Dark Horse’s new comic, SHADOW GLASS, explores just that.

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  • “THE DISCIPLINE” (Comic Book Review)

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    Writer Peter Milligan has always been known to push the boundaries. A participant of the late ‘80s-early ‘90s DC Comics British Invasion scene, he has carved himself out a small but impressive niche alongside comic giants Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Garth Ennis, and Grant Morrison. Though he’s primarily known for his runs on DC/Vertigo title, he has stepped out to lend his talent to other publishers and, with THE DISCIPLINE, has landed on Image Comics doorstep. If the title sounds a bit sexy, that’s because it is, but toss all notions of Fifty Shades aside. Closer to an erotic horror than a horror you find in your moms erotic underwear drawer, THE DISCIPLINE explores the connections between sex, magic, and the madness that lies in between them.

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  • “I AM A HERO” (Comic Book Review)

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    The zombie apocalypse does different things to different people. Some people take up arms and blast away the undead with impunity, while others horde their resources and hide in the woods, and yet others simply turn into human chum bait and become more zombies. But then there is Hideo. When you’re already struggling with schizophrenia and paranoia, how can you really be sure there is a zombie apocalypse to begin with?

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  • “HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY” (Book Review)

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    Not long ago, a juicy-looking tome entitled HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY: THE HEART OF THE MATTER landed on my doorstep. Edited by Joseph Westfall, the paperback book holds 268 pages and is part of Open Court Publishing’s academic “Popular Culture and Philosophy” series, which delves into music, movies, books, characters, and more within sociological and philosophical contexts.

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  • “THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO” (Comic Book Review)

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    From middle school required reading to literary scholars, the name Edgar Allen Poe is recognized across the board as one of the greatest American storytellers of all time. Founder of the detective genre and father of the macabre, Poe has not only had his words printed on paper, but has been adapted into movies, plays, radio dramas, and, of course, comics. Action Comics is the newest company to add their own spin on one of his classics, going with a Poe staple, THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO. Unfortunately, while the creators gave it the full college try, the comic fell short of reaching the same depth that the original story had and lacked the antagonistic frenemy vibe that powered Poe’s words.

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  • The Year in Horror, 2015: 13 Frighteningly Good Reads

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    For those not as passionate about dark culture as those of us who gather at this particular on-line oasis, horror-obsessed family and friends can be difficult to shop for—hence the many gift certificates in FANGORIA fiends’ stockings a few weeks back. We’ve already given readers plenty of film purchase options—check out our exquisitely curated lists from Michael Gingold and Ken Hanley—and for dark literature aficionados, 2015 (give or take a month) had plenty to offer too:

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  • “LEAVING MEGALOPOLIS: SURVIVING MEGALOPOLIS #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    Superheroes have been around for as long as comics have been serialized. Righteous, flamboyantly dressed men and women that fight on the side of justice are as much of a staple of the industry as paper and ink. Yet, despite their popularity, it’s just recently that creators started exploring the exploitative side of their godlike power; proving that perhaps Lex Luthor was right when he said “Devils don’t come from the Hell beneath us, they come from the sky.”

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  • “LOBSTER JOHNSON: THE GLASS MANTIS” (Comic Book Review)

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    With the Mignola-driven universe getting bigger every year, it’s no surprise that the ‘comic-inside-a-comic’ Lobster Johnson would, well, get its own comic! While THE GLASS MANTIS is not the Lobster’s first foray into our world, the newest release continues to prove that 1930’s super-spy, supernatural, superheroes never go out of style. This one-shot follows our hero as he goes up against murder most foul at a museum opening against a backdrop of secrets and revenge. A wonderful homage to early pulp mysteries with just enough spectral chaos to appeal to armchair horror fans, THE GLASS MANTIS fits perfectly in and out of the HELLBOY world.

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  • “KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS” (Comic Book Review)

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    There’s a certain magic in retaining talent from film to comics when it comes to graphic novel tie-ins as opposed to attempting to replicate the magic with new parties. When a film or franchise presents a specific atmosphere, sense of humor and logic, those who know it best can do the best job at carrying that continuity to the page, allowing the illustrators and colorists to do their own thing when it comes to the visual side of things. And with KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS, that’s very much the truth as the inclusion of Michael Dougherty, Zach Shields and Todd Casey ensured the voice and viscera of the film are reflected in this universe-building graphic novel.

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  • “BLACK JACK KETCHUM #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    One of the most popular yet understated subgenres of horror comics in 2015 has undoubtedly been Weird Westerns. Heavy booted rustlers and ruffled women have been clashing with supernatural forces on the pages of such works as Dark Horse’s THE STEAM MAN, IDW’s FISTFUL OF BLOOD, and Image’s newest release, BLACK JACK KETCHUM. A work that walks the line between our reality and the ones behind the veil, BLACK JACK KETCHUM takes the standard outlaw tale and drops it in a SANDMAN-esque story where nothing is really what it seems. Throw in a mute girl with a shotgun and a case of mistaken identity and you got yourself a tale worth its buffalo hide.

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