LOGO
  • “LEAVING MEGALOPOLIS: SURVIVING MEGALOPOLIS #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Superheroes have been around for as long as comics have been serialized. Righteous, flamboyantly dressed men and women that fight on the side of justice are as much of a staple of the industry as paper and ink. Yet, despite their popularity, it’s just recently that creators started exploring the exploitative side of their godlike power; proving that perhaps Lex Luthor was right when he said “Devils don’t come from the Hell beneath us, they come from the sky.”

    Read more »
  • “LOBSTER JOHNSON: THE GLASS MANTIS” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    With the Mignola-driven universe getting bigger every year, it’s no surprise that the ‘comic-inside-a-comic’ Lobster Johnson would, well, get its own comic! While THE GLASS MANTIS is not the Lobster’s first foray into our world, the newest release continues to prove that 1930’s super-spy, supernatural, superheroes never go out of style. This one-shot follows our hero as he goes up against murder most foul at a museum opening against a backdrop of secrets and revenge. A wonderful homage to early pulp mysteries with just enough spectral chaos to appeal to armchair horror fans, THE GLASS MANTIS fits perfectly in and out of the HELLBOY world.

    Read more »
  • “KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    There’s a certain magic in retaining talent from film to comics when it comes to graphic novel tie-ins as opposed to attempting to replicate the magic with new parties. When a film or franchise presents a specific atmosphere, sense of humor and logic, those who know it best can do the best job at carrying that continuity to the page, allowing the illustrators and colorists to do their own thing when it comes to the visual side of things. And with KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS, that’s very much the truth as the inclusion of Michael Dougherty, Zach Shields and Todd Casey ensured the voice and viscera of the film are reflected in this universe-building graphic novel.

    Read more »
  • “BLACK JACK KETCHUM #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    One of the most popular yet understated subgenres of horror comics in 2015 has undoubtedly been Weird Westerns. Heavy booted rustlers and ruffled women have been clashing with supernatural forces on the pages of such works as Dark Horse’s THE STEAM MAN, IDW’s FISTFUL OF BLOOD, and Image’s newest release, BLACK JACK KETCHUM. A work that walks the line between our reality and the ones behind the veil, BLACK JACK KETCHUM takes the standard outlaw tale and drops it in a SANDMAN-esque story where nothing is really what it seems. Throw in a mute girl with a shotgun and a case of mistaken identity and you got yourself a tale worth its buffalo hide.

    Read more »
  • “SATANIC PANIC” (Book Review)

    ,,

    The ’80s: The doddering, bobble-headed Reagans, the Iran-Contra affair and the “Just Say No” slogan. New Wave. VHS and Betamax. Hair metal. Amazing genre films with killer practical FX. Any of these things may spring to mind when you think of that decadent decade, but some of you may recall the nefarious psychological plague that flung itself worldwide in search of cults, black magic, sacrifices and other dark rituals, to say nothing of heavy-metal singers testifying before Congress, murder and suicide by way of music and a decidedly devilish influence on horror films—as well as on GERALDO.

    Read more »
  • “VOICES OF THE DAMNED” (Book Review)

    ,,

    Where to begin? Barbie Wilde has had a… well, pretty wild life. She’s danced professionally at clubs around the world, supported artists like Gary Numan, Ultravox, Depeche Mode, and Adam and the Ants with her group Shock, and has acted in films such as DEATH WISH 3 and played the lone “Female Cenobite” in Clive Barker’s classic, HELLBOUND: HELLRAISER II. You may not know that she was wrote and presented several music and film review TV shows in the ‘80s and ‘90s, interviewing Iggy Pop, The Sisters of Mercy, The B-52s and Johnny Rotten, as well as actors Nicolas Cage and Hugh Grant.

    Read more »
  • “YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST” (Book Review)

    ,,

    The first image that usually comes to mind when someone mentions “Japanese ghost” is the long-haired, white-draped, female spirit a la Sadako from THE RING or Kayako from THE GRUDGE. With their deathly pale faces and blood thirsty drive to kill all who cross their paths, they have become the standard from which many J-Horror spirits have been built from. But, did you know that they are merely the newest interpretation of what is actually a centuries old folk tale? Or that the modern appearance of these ghosts, or better known as yurei, was born out of necessity due to the poor lighting at early kabuki theaters? YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST explores the darker side of Japanese folklore, creating one of the first, modern English texts to thoroughly explore the intricacies of Japans’ beliefs on death, dying, and the afterlife.

    Read more »
  • “CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Of all the popular horror genres, the one that gets the least attention is car horror. While few movies such as CHRISTINE and the 1986 camp favorite MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE (both based on Stephen King stories) take advantage of this rarely traversed trope, it’s still fairly uncommon, even more so for comic books (though with a notable shout out to TALES OF HOTROD HORROR). It’s perhaps this lack of shared tropes that makes CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB so noteworthy.

    Read more »
  • “INVASION” (Book Review)

    ,,

    Here’s a zesty little blast of futuristic, fetishistic nostalgia, for those who prefer their words made out of pictures instead. Patrick McPherson’s INVASION is a gorgeous hardcover coffee table book, representing this photographer’s eye-popping new exhibition, done in clear homage to the look and themes of 1950s-60s science fiction. Only with more transsexuals.

    Read more »
  • “THIS DAMNED BAND #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Satan and rock ‘n’ roll have gone hand in hand ever since Elvis wiggled his hips on TV to the screaming hysterics of girls everywhere. While some bands attempt to quell the fears of the masses by refuting that Dark Lord’s presence anywhere near their work, others like Black Sabbath and the Rolling Stones run with the premise and frequently invoked his unholy visage in their shows. But Satan isn’t actually real, right? Well, according to Motherfather, the stars of Dark Horse’s newest series THIS DAMNED BAND, it depends on who you ask. Exploring the world of satanic worship and its connection to the dark art of music (with a heavy dose of sex and drugs), this title asks the question, “What if Satan is not only real, but he’s been listening to your band all this time?” Perhaps it’s time to lay off the mushrooms.

    Read more »
  • “BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA #13” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA has been a staple of the cult genre since its commercial failing in 1986. Though considered a movie flop during its initial release, it was, in reality, taking its first baby steps into the heart of American kitsch culture. Even now, almost thirty years later, BTILC mania is still going strong and has not only become a favorite initiation watch for burgeoning Carpenter fans, but is even bringing in new fans thanks to BOOM! Studios comic series. An all-original work, the BTILC comic is currently on its unlucky 13th issue and boasts a new creative team and a new storyline for fans who have been wanting to read the series but are not sure where to start.

    Read more »
  • “FRAGMENTS OF HORROR” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Japanese horror manga is a small but popular percentage of comics that come from the Land of the Rising Sun. While most fans are aware of the more popular titles such as ATTACK ON TITAN and HELLSING, there is a whole world of unexplored, smaller works that are more akin to the traditional horror of demons, ghosts, and madness. One of the most prolific creators to contribute to the genre is manga master Junji Ito. Most recognized for his works-turned-movies TOMIE and UZUMAKI, Ito has written and drawn an endless array of mind-boggling works ranging from black comedy to the perverted terrors of the human mind and the merciless universe and, thanks to Viz Media, we are once again graced with a new collection of his translated works titled FRAGMENTS OF HORROR. Both written and illustrated by Ito, it’s an easy introduction to his work for new fans while still keeping true to the intense nature to which seasoned fans have grown accustomed.

    Read more »
Back to Top