LOGO
  • “THIN #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Being beautiful is hard. The exercise, the dieting, the fashion, the skin care; it can be an all-consuming ritual that takes over a person life and dictates their day to day actions. But it’s worth it, right? At least, that’s what Doris thinks when she agrees to undergo a shady procedure to get the body of her dreams. Titled THIN, the newest release into the shadowy subgenre of body horror explores the dark underbelly of beauty and the lengths one woman will go to lose weight. A commentary on our society’s obsession with perfection while showing the delicate balance between food addiction and mental health, THIN is a multi-layered work that’s just as much horror as it is an examination of the demons inside all of us and those demons are hungry!

    Read more »
  • “SEVEN TO ETERNITY #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    High end fantasy has always had a warm home next to horror ever since H.P. Lovecraft birthed Cthulhu on the unexpected populace of post war 1930’s. While he may not be the first to combine giant monsters and the unforgiving cosmos, he is certainly not the last, the most recent addition being SEVEN TO ETERNITY. The newest work from writer Rick Remender (BLACK SCIENCE, LOW), he has once again brought the infinite possibilities of star-traveled imagination to the pages of the four-paneled world. This time, he has focused on a world far from our eco-system where bizarre beasties and multi-legged creepies lurk at every corner and there is no escaping The God of Whispers. Evoking classic fantasy into a modern age, SEVEN TO ETERNITY starts with a bang and doesn’t let up.

    Read more »
  • “DREAD: A HEAD FULL OF BAD DREAMS” (Book Review)

    ,,

    Reading DREAD: A HEAD FULL OF BAD DREAMS is my very first experience with the small publisher Grey Matter Press — and let me tell you, I cannot wait to read more. DREAD: A HEAD FULL OF BAD DREAMS was born from the publisher’s decision to let readers choose the stories from their catalog, and it was a pretty good move. The book is packed with 20 tales and 339 pages of short horror fiction, plus ads and images for other anthologies and novels from some of the best horror writers working today. Just two stories in, I was hooked.

    Read more »
  • “THE GREAT DIVIDE #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    While there are many ways for humanity to die out, if post-apocalyptic movies have anything to say, it’s most likely going to be from blowing holes in the back of each other’s heads. While THE GREAT DIVIDE agrees with this Mad Max sentiment of self-destruction, the newest comic from Dynamite Press has added a twist to traveler-in-a-desert genre: death by touch. In not so near future, death comes in the form of skin to skin contact, not only snuffing out the life of the victim, but trapping them in the body of their killer, like a split personality. A traditional story with an original premise, the first issue takes us deep into the life of one man as he explores the terrain of a land with no law and no touchies.

    Read more »
  • “WOLF IN WHITE VAN” Author John Darnielle Announces Next Novel, “UNIVERSAL HARVESTER”

    ,,

    John Darnielle is most well-known as the lyricist, singer, and songwriter of The Mountain Goats, but he also penned one of the best novels of 2014, WOLF IN WHITE VAN. While that novel dealt with some themes common in horror (or perhaps in the lives of horror fans), Darnielle’s love for the genre has primarily shone through in his music until now.

    Read more »
  • “HELLBOY AND THE BPRD: 1953” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    When most creatures of the night hear the name Hellboy, they know to scatter lest the boogieman’s boogieman come for their heads. But Hellboy wasn’t always the cool-headed monster hunter currently fighting the denizens of Hell that he is now; once he was a simple gruff struggling to learn the ins and outs of the paranormal investigation. HELLBOY AND THE BPRD: 1953 focuses on Hellboys earliest cases as well his adoptive father and BPRD director, Trevor Bruttenholm’s, struggle with Hellboys emerging potential. Harking back to the earlier comics, the trade collects two single issues and a three issue mini -series, creating a work that brings Hellboy back the short story format of occult exploration.

    Read more »
  • “FILMS OF THE NEW FRENCH EXTREMITY: VISCERAL HORROR AND NATIONAL IDENTITY” (Book Review)

    ,,

    Alexandra West’s first book, FILMS OF THE NEW FRENCH EXTREMITY: VISCERAL HORROR AND NATIONAL IDENTITY from McFarland, is one of the few books written on the subject; I’ve confirmed with the author that this book is likely the first to combine the New French Extremity art house and New French Extremity horror movements. West further adjusts her focus through an academic look at film through French identity— and the results are riveting.

    Read more »
  • “WEIRD LOVE #13” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    Love is weird enough as it is, what with the feelings and the touching and the general anxiety of being that close to another sack of skin and meat, but it’s even worse when it’s cursed! Heralding the thirteenth issue of the WEIRD LOVE genre re-prints, IDW has selected a collection of works all centered around love and curses. Whether it be black cats or spilling salt, you better believe these lovely ladies are avoiding any possibility of losing their men to the murky shadows of bad luck. WEIRD LOVE #13 has collected comics from long forgotten love tomes of the ‘50s-’60s and while perhaps some of the comics could have used a quick run through the color cleaners, its vintage vibe makes it a great addition to any classic horror lovers (and horrific lovers) collection.

    Read more »
  • “GREENER PASTURES” (Book Review)

    ,,

    In the exquisitely weird, elegiac title story from Michael Wehunt’s utterly fantastic, seriously disquieting debut collection GREENER PASTURES—out now via Shock Totem—a long-haul trucker desperate to get home to his young daughter and (perhaps not permanently) estranged ex-wife encounters a stranger at an isolated 24-hour diner who appears determined to redirect small talk towards something considerably more esoteric.

    Read more »
  • “TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    The TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE comic has been a longtime coming. Originally intended to be a reboot TV show written by Joe Hill with contributions by Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci, the show hit the way of the dodo when the CW passed on its a promising pilot. Of course, IDW Comics knows an awesome opportunity when they see it and has recently released the TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE as a comic to the excitement of fans everywhere. Luckily, the comics– the brainchild of Joe Hill with artwork by long-time collaborator Gabriel Rodriguez– are an original and fun read of what could have been.  

    Read more »
  • “DISAPPEARANCE AT DEVIL’S ROCK” (Book Review)

    ,,

    A certain New England author has been getting a ton of press lately, and for good reason. Stephen King himself tweeted about how Paul Tremblay’s A HEAD FULL OF GHOSTS scared him and how hard he is to scare. If that’s not the absolute pinnacle of endorsements for a horror author’s work, I don’t know what is. Admittedly, I haven’t yet been able to read GHOSTS, but it is in my reading pile. I was lucky to get an advanced reader’s copy of DISAPPEARANCE AT DEVIL’S ROCK, so I decided to see what all the fuss was about.

    Read more »
  • “SHE-WOLF #1” (Comic Book Review)

    ,,

    If the recent influx of independent horror movies has proven anything, it’s that creativity and surrealism is finally surpassing jump-scares and over-the-top gore. With movies like BEYOND THE BLACK RAINBOW, IT FOLLOWS, and most recently THE WITCH, the trend has not only opened up the door for more experimental movies, but comics as well. Though imaginative comics aren’t anything new (see early HEAVY METAL), we are now finally seeing big publishers pick the strange and independent world that has been rumbling just below the surface, starting with SHE-WOLF.

    Read more »
Back to Top