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    “VOICES OF THE DAMNED” (Book Review)

    Where to begin? Barbie Wilde has had a… well, pretty wild life. She’s danced professionally at clubs around the world, supported artists like Gary Numan, Ultravox, Depeche Mode, and Adam and the Ants with her group Shock, and has acted in films such as DEATH WISH 3 and played the lone “Female Cenobite” in Clive Barker’s classic, HELLBOUND: HELLRAISER II. You may not know that she was wrote and presented several music and film review TV shows in the ‘80s and ‘90s, interviewing Iggy Pop, The Sisters of Mercy, The B-52s and Johnny Rotten, as well as actors Nicolas Cage and Hugh Grant.

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    “YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST” (Book Review)

    The first image that usually comes to mind when someone mentions “Japanese ghost” is the long-haired, white-draped, female spirit a la Sadako from THE RING or Kayako from THE GRUDGE. With their deathly pale faces and blood thirsty drive to kill all who cross their paths, they have become the standard from which many J-Horror spirits have been built from. But, did you know that they are merely the newest interpretation of what is actually a centuries old folk tale? Or that the modern appearance of these ghosts, or better known as yurei, was born out of necessity due to the poor lighting at early kabuki theaters? YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST explores the darker side of Japanese folklore, creating one of the first, modern English texts to thoroughly explore the intricacies of Japans’ beliefs on death, dying, and the afterlife.

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    “CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB #1” (Comic Book Review)

    Of all the popular horror genres, the one that gets the least attention is car horror. While few movies such as CHRISTINE and the 1986 camp favorite MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE (both based on Stephen King stories) take advantage of this rarely traversed trope, it’s still fairly uncommon, even more so for comic books (though with a notable shout out to TALES OF HOTROD HORROR). It’s perhaps this lack of shared tropes that makes CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB so noteworthy.

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    “INVASION” (Book Review)

    Here’s a zesty little blast of futuristic, fetishistic nostalgia, for those who prefer their words made out of pictures instead. Patrick McPherson’s INVASION is a gorgeous hardcover coffee table book, representing this photographer’s eye-popping new exhibition, done in clear homage to the look and themes of 1950s-60s science fiction. Only with more transsexuals.

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    “THIS DAMNED BAND #1” (Comic Book Review)

    Satan and rock ‘n’ roll have gone hand in hand ever since Elvis wiggled his hips on TV to the screaming hysterics of girls everywhere. While some bands attempt to quell the fears of the masses by refuting that Dark Lord’s presence anywhere near their work, others like Black Sabbath and the Rolling Stones run with the premise and frequently invoked his unholy visage in their shows. But Satan isn’t actually real, right? Well, according to Motherfather, the stars of Dark Horse’s newest series THIS DAMNED BAND, it depends on who you ask. Exploring the world of satanic worship and its connection to the dark art of music (with a heavy dose of sex and drugs), this title asks the question, “What if Satan is not only real, but he’s been listening to your band all this time?” Perhaps it’s time to lay off the mushrooms.

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    “BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA #13” (Comic Book Review)

    BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA has been a staple of the cult genre since its commercial failing in 1986. Though considered a movie flop during its initial release, it was, in reality, taking its first baby steps into the heart of American kitsch culture. Even now, almost thirty years later, BTILC mania is still going strong and has not only become a favorite initiation watch for burgeoning Carpenter fans, but is even bringing in new fans thanks to BOOM! Studios comic series. An all-original work, the BTILC comic is currently on its unlucky 13th issue and boasts a new creative team and a new storyline for fans who have been wanting to read the series but are not sure where to start.

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    “FRAGMENTS OF HORROR” (Comic Book Review)

    Japanese horror manga is a small but popular percentage of comics that come from the Land of the Rising Sun. While most fans are aware of the more popular titles such as ATTACK ON TITAN and HELLSING, there is a whole world of unexplored, smaller works that are more akin to the traditional horror of demons, ghosts, and madness. One of the most prolific creators to contribute to the genre is manga master Junji Ito. Most recognized for his works-turned-movies TOMIE and UZUMAKI, Ito has written and drawn an endless array of mind-boggling works ranging from black comedy to the perverted terrors of the human mind and the merciless universe and, thanks to Viz Media, we are once again graced with a new collection of his translated works titled FRAGMENTS OF HORROR. Both written and illustrated by Ito, it’s an easy introduction to his work for new fans while still keeping true to the intense nature to which seasoned fans have grown accustomed.

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    “KUROSAGI CORPSE DELIVERY SERVICE, VOLUME 14” (Comic Book Review)

    After a nearly two and half year wait between volumes, Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service volume 14 finally hits US shores later this month. While many may fear that the wait would spoil the expectation, the newest arrival is just as good as the previous volumes. While definitely a horror comic, KCDS has always focused more on exploring Japanese death rites and fulfilling the last wishes of the dearly departed, and volume 14 expands on this premise as the five central figures go about finding fresh bodies and bringing them home, wherever it may be. It’s an exceptional piece of philosophic horror from our friends across the ocean and is an easy gateway for those who wish to read Japanese manga but prefer a more mature work.

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    “BIRD BOX” (Book Review)

    I don’t know what they’re putting in the water in Detroit, but something really strange is going down in that town.

    It’s like some weird time-release hallucinogen is suddenly sluicing a rarified form of dreamlike paranoia and despair deep into its artistic community, provoking work that’s distinctively both subtle and jarring, simultaneously lulling and fucking with us, dragging us slowly but surely to a haunted place we’ve never seen before but instantly recognize in our souls. All in the constant grip of near-unbearable suspense.

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    “BALLISTIC” (Comic Book Review)

    Subtlety can be a fragile thing. With some forms of storytelling, depending on the tale that’s being told, it could be an artist’s greatest ally, helping plant the seeds to a gradual reveal or hide some incredible character traits that become integral to the plot by the third act. However, for some stories, the absence of subtlety can be inappropriate in execution especially when paired against action and characters who benefit from the colorful and explicit. And in extreme cases such as Adam Egypt Mortimer and Darick Robertson’s BALLISTIC, subtlety is almost nowhere to be seen because the name of the game is cacophony and insanity, which BALLISTIC plays effortlessly.

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    “FIGHT CLUB 2” (Comic Book Review)

    In this era of sequels, prequels, and re-makes, many are left wondering if every big franchise really needs to be revisited and forced to birth another media-frenzied child when the original was perfect all on its own. While some, like MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, successfully float to the top and rake in that sweet fandom money, others, such as POLTERGEIST, crash-and-burn before they even left the launch pad.

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    “SKULLCRACK CITY” (Book Review)

    Let’s face it: most books just sit there and let you read them. They’re like domesticated pets with stories. Some curl up in your lap and purr. Some prefer to wrestle a little, and may even draw occasional blood. Some don’t seem to care whether you’re interested or not. They’re in their own little world. You’re just along for the ride.

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