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    “CUTTER” (Comic Review)

    Bullied kids are always hot fodder for the next big horror hit. From CARRIE to WITCHBOARD, hell hath no fury like an angry teenager with supernatural powers. Digging deep into the pubescent mythos, Top Cow/Image’s latest, CUTTER, brings all that hormone-driven terror to the comic world. Reading like a fast-paced horror thriller, the story follows a group of loosely connected friends who are forced to face some dark secrets when their ranks start dying. While not the most original idea, the comic attempts its best at reviving the dated concept, resulting in a mixed bag of hits and misses.

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    Grant Morrison’s “ANNIHILATOR” (Comic Review)

    Grant Morrison has long been the industry go-to for a taste of the bizarre and unsettling. From monumental moments in the Batman universe, to the re-vamping of forgotten characters, whenever he graces the author nameplate, big things are sure to follow. With Legendary Entertainment now firmly in the comic book game, Morrison’s stepped away from his superhero duties to create an original work titled ANNIHILATOR. A sci-fi book of epic proportions, ANNIHILATOR treats its readers to a tour-de-force of unfiltered, Morrison-inspired madness.

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    “HACK/SLASH: SON OF SAMHAIN #1″ (Comic Review)

    Horror is full of tropes. Established ideas and worn-out scenarios plague the genre so much that so that spoofs and parody are just as common. Running for a solid decade, HACK/SLASH has been a long time favorite for readers who are bit burned out on the repetitive nature of the entertainment of fear. Despite the comic becoming a more serious affair of late—introducing a running story-line and romantic interests for the lead—it still remains fairly tongue-in-cheek, filled with eighties monsters and scantily dressed ladies.

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    “BALTIMORE: THE WITCH OF HARJU” #1 (Comic Review)

    Thanks to the enduring popularity of HELLBOY, creator Mike Mignola has become a staple in the comics industry. With his unique take of Victorian ghost stories mixed with modern monsters, he has crafted go-to reads for newbies and old-time screamers. But despite his overwhelming success, the writer still has some low flying works. Most notably: BALTIMORE, the tale of one man and his war against a world taken over by vampires.

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    “THE SQUIDDER #1″ (Comic Review)

    Ben Templesmith has made a career out of his bizarre horror art and flesh burnt color pallete. While he’s better known for the work he’s done with his partner in crime, Steve Niles, such as 30 DAYS OF NIGHT, HELLSPAWN and CRIMINAL MACABRE, Templesmith has done created plenty of his own comics, penning stories as strangely grotesque as his illustrations. The latest is THE SQUIDDER, Templesmith’s crowdfunded creator-owned tale of apocalyptic madness that’s akin to MAD MAX VS. CTHULHU.

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    “THE TWILIGHT ZONE ANNUAL” (Comic Review)

    THE TWILIGHT ZONE will never die and thank Rod, er, God for that. The shuddery, sophisticated dark fantasy house that Serling built towered over the small screen from 1959 – 1964 (see our recent look at some of the essential episodes HERE) and has spawned ample merchandise, two – to date – television revamps, a feature film (and another reportedly on the way), a radio drama series and comic books. The latter media is resurrected anew courtesy of Dynamite Comics for their THE TWILIGHT ZONE Annual one-shot, three tales of Serling-stained fiction that stay mostly in line with the spirit of the series, if perhaps on occasion being even a notch or two nastier.

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    “DEAD BOY DETECTIVES VOL. 1: SCHOOLBOY TERRORS” (Comic Review)

    Now over twenty years old, Vertigo has changed the comic industry in many ways. DC’S longest running imprint introduced serious takes on magic and horror, the bizarre and mysterious, and have gone on to influence future generations of dreamers, movers and shakers. And with such fan-favorite titles as HELLBLAZER, SANDMAN and FABLES, there’s bound to be numerous spin-offs of oft-mentioned yet unexplored characters that lurk in the underbelly of larger works. One such story is DEAD BOY DETECTIVES. First introduced in SANDMAN #25, the mini-gumshoes saw brief appearances in various publications, along with a couple of limited-series of their own over the years. It wasn’t until this past year did they finally get their own monthly series however, one that’s arrived in cumulated graphic novel, SHOOLBOY TERRORS.

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    “THE FRENZY WOLVES” (Book Review)

    It’s hard to keep up with Buffalo-based lunatic, Greg Lamberson. Writer. Director. Producer. Author. Film Festival director. Father. The man is prolific (see FANGORIA #316 for our extensive feature), tireless and attacks all his interests with vigor. He’s also a great storyteller as well as a fine mythmaker, and his latest novel, THE FRENZY WOLVES, is yet another solid chapter in his vibrant, eccentric body of work.

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    “LUMBERJANES” #3 (Comic Review)

    One of the most profitable and entertaining endeavors currently on television are  cartoons. Shows like ADVENTURE TIME and REGULAR SHOW are pushing the envelope of animation and storytelling, making themselves a mainstay for both children and adults. By understanding that both demographics essentially want the same thing (consistent, smart writing grounded in the human experience), animation has been blowing up. It’s thanks to these trendsetters that we’re seeing a growing interest in the same type of distinctive narrative in comic books, leading to a boundless, new array of works from companies such as IDW and BOOM! Studios. Enter LUMBERJANES, a group of rough-and-tough girls who are looking to take comics by storm. Blending grimy monsters with hilarious hi-jinks, BOOM!’s latest tile  is already making headway in this new frontier.

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