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  • “I AM A HERO” (Comic Book Review)

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    The zombie apocalypse does different things to different people. Some people take up arms and blast away the undead with impunity, while others horde their resources and hide in the woods, and yet others simply turn into human chum bait and become more zombies. But then there is Hideo. When you’re already struggling with schizophrenia and paranoia, how can you really be sure there is a zombie apocalypse to begin with?

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  • “HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY” (Book Review)

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    Not long ago, a juicy-looking tome entitled HANNIBAL LECTER AND PHILOSOPHY: THE HEART OF THE MATTER landed on my doorstep. Edited by Joseph Westfall, the paperback book holds 268 pages and is part of Open Court Publishing’s academic “Popular Culture and Philosophy” series, which delves into music, movies, books, characters, and more within sociological and philosophical contexts.

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  • “THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO” (Comic Book Review)

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    From middle school required reading to literary scholars, the name Edgar Allen Poe is recognized across the board as one of the greatest American storytellers of all time. Founder of the detective genre and father of the macabre, Poe has not only had his words printed on paper, but has been adapted into movies, plays, radio dramas, and, of course, comics. Action Comics is the newest company to add their own spin on one of his classics, going with a Poe staple, THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO. Unfortunately, while the creators gave it the full college try, the comic fell short of reaching the same depth that the original story had and lacked the antagonistic frenemy vibe that powered Poe’s words.

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  • The Year in Horror, 2015: 13 Frighteningly Good Reads

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    For those not as passionate about dark culture as those of us who gather at this particular on-line oasis, horror-obsessed family and friends can be difficult to shop for—hence the many gift certificates in FANGORIA fiends’ stockings a few weeks back. We’ve already given readers plenty of film purchase options—check out our exquisitely curated lists from Michael Gingold and Ken Hanley—and for dark literature aficionados, 2015 (give or take a month) had plenty to offer too:

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  • “LEAVING MEGALOPOLIS: SURVIVING MEGALOPOLIS #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    Superheroes have been around for as long as comics have been serialized. Righteous, flamboyantly dressed men and women that fight on the side of justice are as much of a staple of the industry as paper and ink. Yet, despite their popularity, it’s just recently that creators started exploring the exploitative side of their godlike power; proving that perhaps Lex Luthor was right when he said “Devils don’t come from the Hell beneath us, they come from the sky.”

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  • “LOBSTER JOHNSON: THE GLASS MANTIS” (Comic Book Review)

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    With the Mignola-driven universe getting bigger every year, it’s no surprise that the ‘comic-inside-a-comic’ Lobster Johnson would, well, get its own comic! While THE GLASS MANTIS is not the Lobster’s first foray into our world, the newest release continues to prove that 1930’s super-spy, supernatural, superheroes never go out of style. This one-shot follows our hero as he goes up against murder most foul at a museum opening against a backdrop of secrets and revenge. A wonderful homage to early pulp mysteries with just enough spectral chaos to appeal to armchair horror fans, THE GLASS MANTIS fits perfectly in and out of the HELLBOY world.

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  • “KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS” (Comic Book Review)

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    There’s a certain magic in retaining talent from film to comics when it comes to graphic novel tie-ins as opposed to attempting to replicate the magic with new parties. When a film or franchise presents a specific atmosphere, sense of humor and logic, those who know it best can do the best job at carrying that continuity to the page, allowing the illustrators and colorists to do their own thing when it comes to the visual side of things. And with KRAMPUS: SHADOW OF SAINT NICHOLAS, that’s very much the truth as the inclusion of Michael Dougherty, Zach Shields and Todd Casey ensured the voice and viscera of the film are reflected in this universe-building graphic novel.

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  • “BLACK JACK KETCHUM #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    One of the most popular yet understated subgenres of horror comics in 2015 has undoubtedly been Weird Westerns. Heavy booted rustlers and ruffled women have been clashing with supernatural forces on the pages of such works as Dark Horse’s THE STEAM MAN, IDW’s FISTFUL OF BLOOD, and Image’s newest release, BLACK JACK KETCHUM. A work that walks the line between our reality and the ones behind the veil, BLACK JACK KETCHUM takes the standard outlaw tale and drops it in a SANDMAN-esque story where nothing is really what it seems. Throw in a mute girl with a shotgun and a case of mistaken identity and you got yourself a tale worth its buffalo hide.

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  • “SATANIC PANIC” (Book Review)

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    The ’80s: The doddering, bobble-headed Reagans, the Iran-Contra affair and the “Just Say No” slogan. New Wave. VHS and Betamax. Hair metal. Amazing genre films with killer practical FX. Any of these things may spring to mind when you think of that decadent decade, but some of you may recall the nefarious psychological plague that flung itself worldwide in search of cults, black magic, sacrifices and other dark rituals, to say nothing of heavy-metal singers testifying before Congress, murder and suicide by way of music and a decidedly devilish influence on horror films—as well as on GERALDO.

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  • “VOICES OF THE DAMNED” (Book Review)

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    Where to begin? Barbie Wilde has had a… well, pretty wild life. She’s danced professionally at clubs around the world, supported artists like Gary Numan, Ultravox, Depeche Mode, and Adam and the Ants with her group Shock, and has acted in films such as DEATH WISH 3 and played the lone “Female Cenobite” in Clive Barker’s classic, HELLBOUND: HELLRAISER II. You may not know that she was wrote and presented several music and film review TV shows in the ‘80s and ‘90s, interviewing Iggy Pop, The Sisters of Mercy, The B-52s and Johnny Rotten, as well as actors Nicolas Cage and Hugh Grant.

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  • “YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST” (Book Review)

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    The first image that usually comes to mind when someone mentions “Japanese ghost” is the long-haired, white-draped, female spirit a la Sadako from THE RING or Kayako from THE GRUDGE. With their deathly pale faces and blood thirsty drive to kill all who cross their paths, they have become the standard from which many J-Horror spirits have been built from. But, did you know that they are merely the newest interpretation of what is actually a centuries old folk tale? Or that the modern appearance of these ghosts, or better known as yurei, was born out of necessity due to the poor lighting at early kabuki theaters? YUREI: THE JAPANESE GHOST explores the darker side of Japanese folklore, creating one of the first, modern English texts to thoroughly explore the intricacies of Japans’ beliefs on death, dying, and the afterlife.

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  • “CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB #1” (Comic Book Review)

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    Of all the popular horror genres, the one that gets the least attention is car horror. While few movies such as CHRISTINE and the 1986 camp favorite MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE (both based on Stephen King stories) take advantage of this rarely traversed trope, it’s still fairly uncommon, even more so for comic books (though with a notable shout out to TALES OF HOTROD HORROR). It’s perhaps this lack of shared tropes that makes CYRUS PERKINS AND THE HAUNTED TAXI CAB so noteworthy.

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