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    Ben Wheatley talks his 70s-set adaptation of Ballard’s “HIGH RISE”

    As Ben Wheatley’s madness-fueled (and amazing) A FIELD IN ENGLAND nears U.S. release, the prolific filmmaker is currently entrenched in what could prove to be one of his most anticipated projects yet: a long-gestating adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s seminal HIGH RISE. Currently on the press circuit, talking both A FIELD IN ENGLAND and his directing duty on DOCTOR WHO, Wheatley has revealed first word on what to expect from he and screenwriter Amy Jump’s vision.

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    Full Moon Streaming Teams with Blue Underground

    Full Moon’s subscription streaming service, which offers the entire library of Full Moon Features On Demand for roughly $7 a month has added serious incentive: fifty titles from William Lustig’s Blue Underground label that range from essentials like MONDO CANE and DON’T TORTURE A DUCKLING to cult must-sees GOODBYE UNCLE TOM and FIGHT FOR YOUR LIFE, and much more.

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    Weird Poster, Eerie Stills: Ben Wheatley’s Fantastic “A FIELD IN ENGLAND”

    Ben Wheatley’s latest, the thrilling, overwhelming and very, very strange A FIELD IN ENGLAND is almost upon us. In building anticipation for this singular picture, Drafthouse Films has teamed with frequent collaborator Jay Shaw on a secnd, brand new, even more intense poster, one that both gets to the heart of the film’s surreal elements and references its creepiest scene, of which you can also preview in some new stills.

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    “FAULTS”, Dick Miller and “TEXAS CHAIN SAW” Lead Genre in First SXSW Lineup Announcement

    Sundance has wrapped, the next major U.S. Film Festival is gearing up and true to trend, it seems all of the genre and all of the weird can’t be confined to a singular midnight section. In anticipation of the Midnighters announcement to come, take a look at the first wave of horror within SXSW 2014, which includes Riley Stearns’ feature debut, a documentary on legendary character actor Dick Miller, highly anticipated new films from Alejandro Jodorowsky and Nacho Vigalondo and celebrations of towering classics GODZILLA and THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE.

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    Blumhouse Producing “HOME” from “LAST HOUSE” director

    While unquestionably a hit maker, producer Jason Blum and his Blumhouse Productions must also be lauded for their eye in working with very neat genre filmmakers. Hopefully this is the year we’ll finally see their collaboration with THE STRANGERS director Bryan Bertino, and now Blumhouse is backing HOME, a new film from Dennis Iliadis, the director who helmed THE LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT remake and last year’s very cool pop-art party horror PLUS ONE. 

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  • First Look: Christopher Denham’s “PRESERVATION”

    While sales news (often confused with distribution announcements) is rarely interesting in general, sometimes it gives us the first look at a very exciting project. Example: PRESERVATION, the new film from actor/filmmaker Christopher Denham, who starred in the fantastic SOUND OF MY VOICE, as well as wrote and directed the undervalued and possibly eeriest of contemporary found footage films, HOME MOVIE. XYZ Films, the production company and sales agency behind the likes of THE RAID 2, SPRING (from RESOLUTION directors Benson & Moorhead) and much more have taken world sales rights for PRESERVATION in anticipation of the upcoming European Film Market and an early glimpse, as well as synopsis on the movie is out.

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    “DEAD SNOW; RED VS. DEAD” (Sundance Movie Review)

    Fake it till you make it; whether you put any stock in the old adage or not, it seems to have worked wonders for Norwegian filmmaker, Tommy Wirkola. Having broken through with a film based on a great concept that rarely results in something great (Nazi Zombies), Wirkola had cultivated a true fanbase. Still, and without discounting the undoubtedly hard work that goes into crafting a feature film, the director received much (justified) criticism for over-relying on stylistic influence and homage, particularly to the comedic horror of Sam Raimi and early Peter Jackson. In the intervening five years however—which saw him hit Hollywood with the goofy good time HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS—the filmmaker seems to have honed his horror-comedy craft, developing his own style, confronting his past shortcomings and delivering a film both worthy of its base idea and a packed house.

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