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    The Trailer for the Bizarre “HORSEHEAD” Is a Must-See

    Nightmare logic seems the order of the day in Romain Basset’s HORSEHEAD (aka FIEVRE), a sleep-centric and dream-fuelled horror story about a young woman repeatedly haunted by a figure called Horsehead and attempting to confront it with bouts of Lucid Dreaming. The resulting first trailer is an enrapturing, bizarre preview for what could become one of the (my) most anticipated horror films of the year.

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    First Image: “WAKE WOOD” Director’s “CHERRY TREE”

    Dark Sky Films previously teamed with Ireland’s Fantastic Films on the undervalued WAKE WOOD, a MONKEY’S PAW-influenced bit of folk horror that I find myself recommending often to those looking for something eerie, something bloody and something a little underseen. Exciting news then that the distributor and production company continue their relationship with the Irish outfit on CHERRY TREE, a new film from WAKE WOOD director David Keating, which doesn’t sound far off from the “careful what you wish for” themes of his previous work. 

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    Refn “BRINGING” Cecil Hotel Horror to the Big Screen

    Nicolas Winding Refn just might be turning his eye to pure horror. A noted fan of genre (he’s producing the MANIAC COP remake and can be found on the new SNUFF Blu singing the film’s praises), Refn’s often violent, nightmarish cinema has brushed right up against our bounds. Thrilling then, he’s apparently sought out directing duties on THE BRINGING, a script initially inspired by the viral video of a young woman in a strange elevator, who was later found dead in a Los Angeles hotel water tower.

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    Ben Wheatley’s “HIGH RISE” casts Irons, Miller

    Is there a developing, almost ready-for-production feature more exciting than Ben Wheatley’s brewing adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s seminal HIGH RISE? It goes beyond simply being a new film from Wheatley and co-writer Amy Jump (KILL LIST, A FIELD IN ENGLAND); it’s also poised to be their biggest. The long-gestating project (producer Jeremy Thomas has been trying for years and years) has attracted a stellar cast to its satirical horror story, including Tom Hiddleston and now Jeremy Irons and Sienna Miller.

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    Official Trailer: “DELIVER US FROM EVIL” Promises New York Horror

    It often feels that truly thrilling, city-based horror is few and far between, and yet there’s so much anxiety and fear to exploit on packed streets. Will DELIVER US FROM EVIL get it right? The new, lengthier official trailer makes it seem so. Scott Derrickson (SINISTER, THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE) went on location in the South Bronx and, alongside some heavy accents, looks to have crafted an ominous tale of possession plaguing urban landscape.

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    New Images from Ryan Gosling’s “LOST RIVER”; Von Trier also developing Detroit-based horror film

    The urban decay and otherworldiness of America’s once booming Detroit is currently inspiring/being exploited by a litany of filmmakers and being utilized in everything from advertisements to a slate of genre pictures in various states of completion. For instance, we’ve many of us just seen Jim Jarmusch’s fantastic ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE, while this month’s Cannes will host the premiere of Ryan Gosling’s curious and highly anticipated LOST RIVER. Now, word comes that the great Lars von Trier will return to horror (following EPIDEMIC, THE KINGDOM and ANTICHRIST) with the developing DETROIT.

    In order of fruition, find two new images from LOST RIVER, below, as well as Gosling’s Director’s Statement for Cannes, which finds the actor revealing directors Derek Cianfrance and Nicolas Winding Refn (BRONSON, ONLY GOD FORGIVES), as well as the city of Detroit as inspirations for the film. Described as something of a horror-fantasy-noir, LOST RIVER stars Christina Hendricks, Iain De Caestecker, Saoirse Ronan, Matt Smith and Barbara Steele. The film follows Billy (Hendricks), a single mother of two, swept into a macabre and dark fantasy underworld while Bones, her eighteen-year-old son, discovers a secret road leading to an underwater town. Both Billy and Bones must dive deep into the mystery, if their family is to survive.

    Both the Statement and images come from fansite Ryan Gosling Addicted:

    This film was, in a lot ways, a gift from the directors I’ve been working with over the last few years. I’ve gone between acting in films completely based in reality with Derek Cianfrance to the fevered dreams of Nicolas Winding Refn. I think I’ve vacillated between these two extremes because my own sensibilities as a filmmaker lay somewhere in-between.

    It’s not until I had the opportunity to work on The Ides of March that I was introduced to Detroit, a place that is currently living on the border of those two realities. Although I was only there for a few days I couldn’t help but be affected by the city. It was on the verge of declaring bankruptcy. There were forty miles of abandoned neighborhoods and, within pockets of those neighborhoods, there were parents trying to raise their children on streets where houses were being burned and torn down around them. Detroit was the birthplace of the Model T, Motown and the middle class. It was, at one time, a postcard for the American Dream but now, for the families in these neighborhoods, the dream has become a nightmare. Having said that, there is still a lot of hope there. There is something very inspiring about the consciousness in Detroit. What it once was and will be again is still very much alive. I knew I had to make something there.

    I kept returning over the following year, trying to document some of these neighborhoods before they were torn down or destroyed and I began to think of a story that took place not in Detroit, but in Lost River, an imagined city with an imagined past. As the elements of the story began to emerge; a family losing their home, a mysterious secret beneath the surface, I drew from the 80’s family fantasy films that I grew up with and filtered them through the sensibilities about film I’ve acquired since. With that, Lost River began to take shape for me in the form of a dark fairy tale with the city itself as the damsel in distress and the characters as broken pieces of a dream, trying to put themselves back together.

    Meanwhile, Indiewire has translated an interview with filmmaker Kristian Levring, whose Mads Mikkelsen-starring western THE SALVATION is also premiering at Cannes this month. He told Soundvenue that his enthusiasm for a hypothetical “real horror movie” from Lars von Trier has resulted in von Trier writing it. “I’ve always thought that Lars would be able to do a fantastic horror movie. And I’ve told him so many times throughout the years, and in the end he said: ‘I want you to stop talking about it, so I’ll write it for you instead.'” 

    While still quite early yet, Levring explains, “It takes place in Detroit, and then there is the wordplay between Detroit and ‘destroyed.’ It’s about a man fighting his inner demons. That doesn’t tell that much, but that’s because we haven’t gotten any further so far. It’s real horror. Of course, there is a psychological aspect, but it’s a real horror movie. That’s what we’re aiming for, at least.”

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    “AMERICAN HORROR STORY”: Ryan Murphy talks the “FREAK SHOW”

    COVEN may have underwhelmed upon completion, but the beauty of AMERICAN HORROR STORY lies in its seasonal reinvention, allowing creators Ryan Murphy & Brad Falchuk and their horror troupe to lure us in anew every year. For season four, the time and place utterly warped by the show’s vision will be a circus in 1950s Jupiter, Florida where series star Jessica Lange will play a German ex-pat managing said carnival. We’ve previously learned actors Kathy Bates, Sarah Paulson, Angela Bassett and Evan Peters are also returning (where is Lily Rabe?!). But what of new characters?

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    Red Band Trailer: Bong Joon-ho’s Highly Anticipated “SNOWPIERCER”

    Bong Joon-ho’s (THE HOST, MOTHER) acclaimed and eagerly awaited adaptation of post-apocalytpic French graphic novel LA TRANSPERCENEIGE has had a long road to U.S. theaters, entangled in will they/won’t they with the The Weinstein Company over whether the film needed to be cut for American audiences’ presumed attention span. We’re thrilled to see it’s arriving from Radius-TWC this June in full, and the theatrical trailer previews the visually enticing, violent tale of class warfare aboard a train we’re hoping for.

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