LOGO
  • Q&A: Eli Roth on Venturing Into “THE GREEN INFERNO,” Part Two

    ,,,

    When Eli Roth set out to make his cannibal shocker THE GREEN INFERNO (in theaters this Friday), he didn’t do it in the safety of a studio setting; he took his cast and crew into the wilds of the Peruvian jungle (and explained his reasons in part one of this interview). It’s certainly an ambitious and, some might say, insane production model to follow, yet one that lends an almost indescribable sense of danger to the final movie.

    Read more »
  • “HELLIONS” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    After taking a few years off from horror following his impressive genre debut PONTYPOOL, Canadian cult filmmaker Bruce McDonald has dipped his toes back into the pool with HELLIONS. His latest effort isn’t quite as ambitious as the last one, but it is an endearingly creepy and creative little effort that showcases his technical prowess, even if the script doesn’t quite feel substantial enough for feature length treatment.

    Read more »
  • “HARDCORE” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    HARDCORE is a tricky movie to review. On the one hand, there’s no denying that it’s an extraordinary, ground-breaking achievement on a technical level, offering a cinematic rush that’s unlike anything that’s ever been seen before. On the other hand, beyond pure technique and visceral thrills, the flick is almost insultingly stupid and frequently poorly acted. However, if you can get past any hope of compelling characters or a meaningful storyline, there’s no denying that HARDCORE will knock your socks off as a pure thrill ride. You’ve just got to check your brain at the door or, better yet, remove it entirely.

    Read more »
  • “THE DEVIL’S CANDY” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    Australian director Sean Byrne caused quite a stir with his 2009 debut THE LOVED ONES when it premiered at TIFF’s midnight madness. A peculiar mix of John Hughes teen melodrama and harsh gore horror, THE LOVED ONES toyed with viewers and twisted expectations in a manner designed to specifically please movie nerds. Unfortunately, studios didn’t quite know what to make of THE LOVED ONES, and the film took ages to actually reach screens after making the festival rounds. So it’s not too surprising that Byrne’s long delayed return is a far more conventional genre effort, nor is it particularly surprising that the more conventional movie isn’t quite as interesting.

    Read more »
  • “FEBRUARY” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    As chilly as the title suggests and surprisingly subtly mounted, FEBRUARY is a disorienting and bizarre twist on some familiar horror tropes. The first feature by Osgood Perkins (son of PSYCHO icon Anthony Perkins) takes a few concepts that will be familiar to many genre aficionados, then twists them through odd narrative knots and laces them with unexpected dramatic weight until the film begins to feel like something new. It’s tough to say how strong this story would be without it’s unconventional telling,  but thankfully, things turn out devilishly well as it is.

    Read more »
  • “HIGH-RISE” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    Through his work in films like KILL LIST, SIGHTSEERS, and A FIELD IN ENGLAND, director Ben Wheatley has established himself as a twisted cinematic force. Armed with a distinctly cynical outlook, a dark wit, and a knack for unexpectedly graphic gut-punches, Wheatley delivers comedies and dramas that have the visceral shock impact of horror. Thus far, Wheatley has typically played in the realist realm that earned him comparisons to the likes of Mike Leigh (only with a blood-soaked streak); however, his latest feature is a different beast entirely. Based on a novel by CRASH’s J.G. Ballard, HIGH-RISE unfolds like a cinematic nightmare. It’s a deliberately alienating experience designed to thrust audiences into a nastily satirical vision of society and leave them in a state of disturbed awe.

    Read more »
  • “GREEN ROOM” (TIFF Film Review)

    ,,

    Following up his award-winning grimy art house thriller BLUE RUIN, writer/director Jeremy Saulnier returns with an even more intense and satisfying film that goes straight for the jugular (at times, rather literally). Pitched somewhere between siege and survival horror, this punks vs. neo-Nazis tale (you know, that old chestnut), is a harsh and vicious little genre effort laced with just enough cynical humor to qualify as sterling entertainment. It’s a nasty movie that, above all else, confirms Saulnier’s versatile talents and provides genre fans with enough raucous entertainment to likely earn itself a bit of a cult status somewhere down the road.

    Read more »
  • “THE WITCH” (TIFF Movie Review)

    ,,,

    Set in the paranoid and devotedly religious period New England and told in a manner that blurs the line between the imagined and the supernatural, Robert Eggers’ THE WITCH is one of the more remarkable horror debuts in recent years. Eggers takes the material and period detail quite seriously, so a romp this is not as terrifying as it might be. Perched somewhere between the art house and gore lore, the film is an ideal genre entry in film festivals that will worm its way under the weathered skin of film snobs and genre aficionados alike. It’s not an easy horror ride, but an enjoyable one worth taking, especially for those with a longstanding fear of goats.

    Read more »
  • The Cutting Room: Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy talk “THE EDITOR”, Part Two

    ,,

    Welcome to THE CUTTING ROOM, a new weekly column on FANGORIA.com that highlights the stories that most share DNA of our print counterpart. Rather than just feature the articles and interviews that didn’t make the cut, this column is dedicated to providing a greater lifeline between FANGORIA Magazine and FANGORIA.com.

    Read more »
  • The Cutting Room: Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy talk “THE EDITOR”, Part One

    ,,

    Welcome to THE CUTTING ROOM, a new weekly column on FANGORIA.com that highlights the stories that most share DNA of our print counterpart. Rather than just feature the articles and interviews that didn’t make the cut, this column is dedicated to providing a greater lifeline between FANGORIA Magazine and FANGORIA.com.

    Read more »
  • Interview: Brian Yuzna talks “SOCIETY” Blu-ray and Sequel!

    ,

    Brian Yuzna’s SOCIETY is easily one of the strangest damn horror movies ever made and as a direct result, one of the best. It’s one of those films that slots into the horror genre almost out of a lack of any other proper genre classification. The project was the directorial debut for Yuzna, who had previously established himself in the business by producing Stuart Gordon’s first string of flicks starting with RE-ANIMATOR. Given total directorial freedom, Yuzna delivered something that is simultaneously a searing satirical comment America’s great class divide, a campy send up of teen melodrama, a paranoid thriller, and thanks to an unforgettably icky finale, one of the goopiest genre flicks ever made.

    Read more »
Back to Top