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    Q&A: John Caglione Jr. talks SFX on “C.H.U.D.”, “AMITYVILLE II” & more…

    John Caglione Jr. is a make-up SFX maestro who has worked on horror classics like AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION, C.H.U.D, BASKET CASE as well as taking the world by storm with his groundbreaking Oscar winning make-ups for Warren Beatty’s DICK TRACY. But before the 40s comic book detective got his big screen update in 1990, Caglione was in service of another famous Dick.

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    Q&A: Horror Maestro Mick Garris Revisits “PSYCHO IV: THE BEGINNING”

    We all know the story of the Bates Motel and it’s strange dark secrets. We also know about that shy, man-child living up in that big ole dark house high on the hill just behind the motel. But how much do we actually know about him; this introverted, somber, effete painfully meek odd man? Well, now, with BATES MOTEL, we may think we know Norman Bates in and out, but horror director Mick Garris had the pleasure of bringing Norman Bates’s back story to the small screen first with his vibrantly lit and nicely plotted film PSYCHO IV. He also remembers star Anthony Perkins’s complex nature and attitude towards the film, working with the likes of Olivia Hussey and Henry Thomas, and applying masterful artistic designs on a made-for-TV film…

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    “CHRISTINE” Revisited, Part Two: A Q&A with Alexandra Paul

    She was the other woman in Arnie Cunningham’s life, but no one got in between him and Chrisine. There was no room for Leigh Cabot, the all-American beauty and new girl in school, according to the ’58 Plymouth Fury who tried everything possible to remove this human love interest. Now, actress and activist Alexandra Paul spends some time with FANGORIA talking about first love, becoming a Stephen King fan and being number one competition for the monstrous machine Christine….

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    CHRISTINE Revisited, Part One: A Q&A with Keith Gordon

    Thirty years ago, director John Carpenter took to the driver’s seat in adapting one of Stephen King’s most successful novels from the early ‘80s: CHRISTINE. The result: a taut, beautifully realized film that was not only a top notch horror flick, but a brilliant exploration into America’s romance with the automobile! CHRISTINE is all about possession and obsession, and the monster herself sets her high beams on the pathetic miserable Arnold Cunningham. Transforming for the worse as a result of “owning” the titular ’58 Plymouth Fury, Keith Gordon gave life to Arnold Cunningham all those years ago, and recently spent some time with FANGORIA to revisit his past love- that sleek, sexy but sinister CHRISTINE…

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    Exclusive Q&A: Lance Henriksen Opens Up on “DAMIEN: OMEN 2″

    Lance Henriksen: the name alone evokes many memorable performances and epitomizes the sheer essence of a versatile, dedicated and downright brilliant actor. From his portrayal of a renegade desert-dwelling bloodsucker in NEAR DARK to doing his bit in eco-horror gory glory in PIRANHA 2: THE SPAWNING to his iconic performance of the android Bishop in ALIENS to even giving a voice to the patriarchal formidable silverbac Kerchakk in Disney’s adaptation of TARZAN, Henriksen is quite simply a force of swaggering, hyper-masculine talent.

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  • Regan’s Not-So-Absent Father: A Personal Tribute to Make-up Legend Dick Smith

    When I was about six years old, already completely devoted to horror movies- having being raised on the classic Universal films, American International Pictures, Hammer films and so forth- I remember hearing snippets of stories from my family about some mysterious film called THE EXORCIST. “It’s very scary,” said an aunt; “What a terrifying film that is!” said my mother. So when Melbourne network Channel 9 scheduled the screening of this controversial horror film in the early eighties, I was beside myself with anticipation (albeit being “modified for television”).

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    Zombies, Waxworks, Tomatoes and “TWIN PEAKS”: An Interview with Dana Ashbrook

    With his heavy mop of dark brown hair, smoldering good looks and dark intensity, actor Dana Ashbrook made a massive impression as slacker and one-time football hero Bobby Briggs in David Lynch and Mark Frost’s seminal 90s TV series TWIN PEAKS (now available on Blu in its entirety); a show that deconstructed the traditional soap opera and injected it with terror and black comedy. Ashbrook seemed to make his career out of films that meshed horror and humor and he spent some time with FANGORIA to shoot the breeze and talk all things tomato, Tarman and TWIN PEAKS…

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  • Mutants of Melbourne: Director Rob Taylor Crowdfunds Splatter Throwback, “HUMAN GARBAGE”

    Inspired by the likes of Peter Jackson’s splatterfest BAD TASTE, J. Michael Muro’s wonderfully grotesque STREET TRASH and Lloyd Kaufman’s Troma favorite THE TOXIC AVENGER, Melbourne-based independent filmmaker (and board member of local film society Cinemaniacs) Rob Taylor is knee deep in blood and guts working on 80s-style gore-soaked satirical horror flick, HUMAN GARBAGE.

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    “THE SEARCH FOR WENG WENG” Doc looks to Kickstarter for completion

    I was first introduced to the diminutive James Bond rip-off from the Philippines known as Weng Weng at my friend Anthony Biancofiore’s house long after an alcohol fueled party. Anthony is a big fan of the “little people” and it goes beyond an admiration and love for Billy Barty and the cast of UNDER THE RAINBOW. His devotion to dwarf stars extends to Bridget the Midget and her fellow small stature artistes in the world of adult entertainment and this strange oddity called Weng Weng; who with the help of his trusty umbrella that he uses to fly around à la Mary Poppins, his fast punchy kung-fu moves and his harem of regular sized sultry sexy starlets, has become an icon of cult cinema and is a significant part of Filipino culture.

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    DAMIANO DAMIANI, 1922-2013

    A lot of artists are sometimes trapped by their race and/or their heritage; auteurs outside of America that make superlative and innovative films are often quoted as “French director” or “German expressionist” and sometimes these people would just for once like to hear “director” or “expressionist” as a sole description, leaving the nation of origin out. Race, for many of these artists, shouldn’t matter. And this was the case for Damiano Damiani, a versatile and groundbreaking filmmaker, who passed away March 7th at his home in Rome age 90.

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